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Articles: Teaching & Learning

Higher ed administrators are using apps and platforms behind the scenes to help create efficiencies, increase productivity, and manage projects and workflow.

1. Set some ground rules. After introducing Slack, some users felt it was hard to cut through the clutter of irrelevant information, says Dominic Abbate, the creative director at The George Washington University. So they responded by setting up specific channels designated for non-work chit-chat like #food and #just-for-fun.

2. Listen to feedback. When Cherwell’s adoption rate was lagging because the tool was too complex and IT-focused, The University of New Mexico’s IT team redesigned the portal to make it more customer-friendly.

Yammer (free)

Good for: Collaboration and communication

Who’s using it: Penn State

From event planning to website redesign, setting up Yammer networking groups to share ideas, get feedback and check in on the progress of projects can help large campuses stay connected.

Trello (free)

Good for: Tracking projects

Who’s using it: The George Washington University

First-year college students with executive function (EF) difficulties arrive on campus and can be overwhelmed by the independence.

Disabilities services administrators at Greenfield Community College in Massachusetts, University of Connecticut and Landmark College in Vermont recommend the following assistive technology for students with executive dysfunction:

Higher ed institutions in the U.S. lead the world when it comes to producing graduates who go on to create unicorns—private start-up companies worth in excess of $1 billion, such as Uber, Facebook or SpaceX.

Donna Fletcher is a higher ed professor of finance at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Legislators, parents and students are not the only ones asking questions about the cost and quality of higher education.

Ten years ago, few universities employed chief information security officers. Now these administrators—known as CISOs—lead teams dedicated to shielding information, systems and research from internet thieves, and to keeping up with federal regulations.

University Business's new, tablet-friendly eBook, Online Learning, provides an overview of what’s new, what’s working and what’s ahead for institutions in all stages of developing and growing their online learning programs.

Access your free copy today to learn how your online learning program can

Russ McDonald, head of United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck, North Dakota, is serving on a new federal commission to address the challenges facing Native American children.

Russ McDonald, head of United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck, North Dakota, is serving on a new federal commission to address the challenges facing Native American children.

Over ten years ago, members of the humanities division at Blinn College, a two-year community college with four campuses and 18,000 students in central Texas, long suspected students were either not submitting original copy or working with peers on projects when collaboration wasn’t allowed.
 
Teachers had performed Google searches whenever unoriginality was suspected but knew some plagiarized work was slipping through the cracks, says Audrey Wick, an English professor at Blinn.
 

More than a quarter million hours—that’s how much time students at the University of Arizona collectively spent watching recorded lectures, flipped classroom presentations, and other academic video just last year.

But it wasn’t always this way. In fact, just a short time ago, the University of Arizona was like many other institutions when it came to supporting lecture capture and academic video: Different departments experimenting with different solutions to support different objectives.

Most U.S. colleges and universities have an LMS for academic activities, including posting syllabuses, grading and sending out announcements.

Online faculty at Castleton University don’t just dole out tests—they take them, too. Full- and part-time instructors who have no experience teaching online with Moodle’s learning management system work through a self-paced, six-module course created by associate academic dean Cathy Kozlik. 

Maenette K.P. Ah Nee-Benham, who's taught higher ed since 1993, was honored as Educator of the Year by The Native Hawaiian Education Association in 2015.

Maenette K.P. Ah Nee-Benham is the new chancellor of the University of Hawai’i West O’ahu. A native Hawaiian, Benham was previously the inaugural dean of the Hawai’inuiakea School of Hawaiian Knowledge at University of Hawai’i Manoa, the only college of indigenous knowledge at a Research I institution in the U.S.

Campus technology leaders report significant new investment to come this year in the area of academic tech tools such as lecture capture, AV equipment and active classroom initiatives. It’s the third year in a row academic technology led the list of top significant investments in a UB survey. 

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