You are here

Articles: Teaching & Learning

Up to 500 faculty at 25 higher ed institutions will become better equipped to help students prepare for career and workplace success.

READY FOR THE REAL WORLD—Students participate in a financial literacy course at Indiana University. The institution’s MoneySmarts U. program offers electives specifically for graduating seniors.

Some colleges and universities tailor their financial literacy courses to students in the immediate transition from campus to the bigger world.

As more textbooks and other learning materials become digitized, institutions regularly face challenges in smoothly integrating all the different resources into the LMS and other campus networks.

What should campus administrators consider as they integrate their digital textbooks and e-learning materials with their LMS and SIS systems? 

“Campus administrators need to ensure they understand their student experience goals relating to digital content. The technology ecosystem they use to manage and deliver this experience needs to be considered in full, and in service of their student needs—including privacy, content performance data and individual student data.”

—Ken Chapman, vice president of Market Research, D2L

Integration between digital learning materials and an institution’s learning and administrative systems has gotten better, but instructors, higher ed administrators and providers agree there’s more work to be done.

That work, providers say, is easier when all parties pitch in to figure out how to best serve students.

Annual performance reviews are shunned for good reason. Many higher education institutions question the wisdom of this antiquated approach and are exploring alternatives.

As huddle rooms within academic buildings grow in popularity, what challenges—perhaps unexpected ones—tend to crop up for administrators and professors? 

Providers were asked: How well are colleges using data to measure faculty performance, and what related areas need the most improvements?

“Colleges will typically show the faculty how their scores compare to others at the school, usually those in the same department. But they rarely ask the instructors how they plan to improve any low scores they've earned or coach them how to do so. Closing this feedback loop will improve the students' experience.”

—Howard Walters, SmartEvals.com

Measuring faculty effectiveness has never been a perfect science—and it has always held potential for contention among instructors and administrators.

COOKING UP BETTER HEALTH—Med students at The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane get hands-on culinary lessons to learn how food preparation and diet impact illness. The center was the first dedicated teaching kitchen to be implemented at a medical school.

More than 40 medical schools have added culinary medicine programs to the menu to help students better understand how to combat obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

The massive growth of on-campus video is increasing the desire for innovations that naturally leverage the benefits of artificial intelligence.

Many colleges and universities are ramping up their efforts to teach students how to manage loan payments and other expenses.

The growing interest in artificial intelligence may hold the key to a more personalized learning experience.

Whether you call them huddle rooms, breakout rooms or collaboration rooms, small group spaces cropping up in various campus buildings are changing the way academic facilities are used.

Meghan Hollowell is dean of College Support Services at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

From IT support staff to upper-level administration, everyone wants to protect student data from the hackers who hope to pilfer it.

Pages