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When we think of “media,” images of the press spring to mind. Instances of “fake news” wreaked havoc throughout the 2016 presidential election, and subsequent accusations of the same levied against news organizations from top officials have dominated news narratives ever since.

My primary goal as a journalism professor is to encourage students to be “media literate.” But as a professional communicator, I understand media literacy doesn’t end with being able to decipher whether a news story is true or false.

Many have spoken positively about the next generation of learning technologies, but there is reason for apprehension. While the enthusiasm of those joining the move to digital assets is encouraging, there is a certain amount of naiveté that comes with it. As a result, when people advocate for certain digital initiatives, it causes some to question what could go wrong.

Over the summer, we visited Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York, a bucolic campus surrounded by the splendid isolation of the Adirondack Mountains and blue necklace of lakes and rivers.

In a higher education landscape marked by a shrinking student population and increasing uncertainty, institutional longevity—if not short term survival—is top of mind for most. What many at-risk institutions fail to see, however, is that a primary focus on competition is a precarious survival strategy that more often than not, backfires. Cooperation, not competition is the way out.

At Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science’s Innovation and Research Park in Chicago, the first building in what could be a multiphase development will generate an estimated 500 jobs and $117 million annually.

Nick Mance is president of Southwestern Illinois College, Community College District #522.

Nick Mance resigned recently as chair of the board of trustees at Southwestern Illinois College, Community College District #522, and has become president of the college.

DISCUSSING COLLEGE COSTS—Moderated by FutureEd Director Thomas Toch (left), the panel discussion included Martha Kanter of the College Promise Campaign; Harry Holzer, former chief economist for the U.S. Department of Labor under President Clinton; Tiffany Jones from Education Trust; and Jen Mishory, author of a book about college promise programs.

Eighteen states and dozens of local jurisdictions and institutions have established “promise programs” to make college free. A panel of educators and economists addressed program success at a recent FutureEd event.

Institutions with the highest mobility rates for low-income students:

HBCUs: 

Alcorn State University (Miss.), Southern University and A&M College (La.), Lincoln University (Pa.), Dillard University (La.) and Alabama State University


Link to main story: Minority-serving higher ed institutions take lead on upward mobility

TECH EFFECT—CUNY Lehman College, a Hispanic-serving institution, recently opened a virtual reality center on its campus in the Bronx to train students for careers in cutting-edge industries.

An American Council on Education report finds that minority-serving schools move low-income students up from the lowest income brackets at two to three times the rates of non-minority-serving institutions. 

Washington State University’s step-by-step process for marijuana violations:

1. Attend cannabis workshop.


Link to main story: College campuses cope with increased marijuana legalization


2. Complete marijuana eCheckup To Go online assessment. Once finished, results direct students to either:

- Attend a second, more intensive cannabis workshop OR

Marijuana remains the most popular drug among college students, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. (gettyimages.com: Sara ruiz)

Higher ed institutions face challenges in nine states that allow marijuana's recreational use, in 30 states that permit its medical use, or in other states where the drug remains illegal.

Creating an online community that mirrors a school’s physical campus is another way to retain online students.

This can be achieved by digitizing freshman orientation, mental health counseling, and career and résumé services.


Link to main story: College students learning online, but stepping on campus

Many online students still have on-campus business, such as meeting with instructors and making payments, according to “Online College Students: Comprehensive Data on Demands and Preferences,” The Learning House Inc. (UBmag.me/demands).

Like their peers on campus, students enrolled in online programs benefit when they feel included in a community. Colleges cater to this population by offering in-person special events and extended office hours.

The public’s call for more transparency in all segments of higher education administration has brought particular scrutiny to the admissions process. The fairness of race is again under question.

What is the biggest challenge administrators have fostering trusting relationships between students and faculty? What’s the most innovative way you’ve seen a college tackle this challenge?

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