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Meghan Hollowell is dean of College Support Services at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

From IT support staff to upper-level administration, everyone wants to protect student data from the hackers who hope to pilfer it.

Question 1: What are the most common misconceptions about teletherapy services for college students?

“With teletherapy still being relatively new to colleges and consumers, there is often the misconception that this is a new type of healthcare service in itself. But teletherapy is just a means of providing therapy as we’ve known it through a medium that creates more access for more students.”

—Cody Semrau, founder and CEO, BetterMynd

Teletherapy has been around for more than two decades and can be delivered through videoconferencing, phone or online messaging. (Gettyimages.com: sjenner13).

Here’s what campus administrators need to know about virtual behavioral health services and how to implement them.

Teletherapy has been around for more than two decades and can be delivered through videoconferencing, phone or online messaging.

Alternate terms for teletherapy include telebehavioral health, telepsychiatry, e-behavioral health, telemental health, e-care and telecare.

Multiple peer-reviewed studies, including several meta-analyses, show that teletherapy is as effective as in-person therapy for certain conditions.

A handful of university medical centers around the country offer telemedicine services to the broader community.

Typically, these services are designed to provide options for people who live in remote areas and tend to have less access to health specialists.


Link to main story: TeleHELP in higher ed

Marc C. Whitt is director of philanthropy communications at University of Kentucky Philanthropy. Follow him on LinkedIn (linkedin.com/in/marcwhitt) or Twitter (@marcwhitt). 

Just as Amazon and Netflix have personalized the user experience, we too must develop personalized communication and marketing experiences.

Here, colleges and universities that haven’t yet organized an instant decision day can find answers to four key questions about strategy and logistics.

Some schools now offer training where employees learn to better understand mental illness, to recognize coworkers or family members who may be in trouble, and to encourage people to get help.

A culturally rich, historically black neighborhood in Pensacola, Florida, has been experiencing gentrification.

To keep the legacy of the Belmont-DeVilliers community alive, a local engineer is guiding a group of University of West Florida undergraduates creating a virtual version of the neighborhood—along with a small brick-and-mortar museum to showcase the project. 

It’s just one of many such opportunities at West Florida.

As the trend in active learning classrooms has accelerated internationally, colleges in the U.S. can learn from the cutting-edge classroom design and technology that other countries have built.

Why should U.S. colleges and universities follow global trends in active classrooms? What is the biggest lesson administrators can learn?

Former Lyon College president Brian C. Mitchell co-wrote "How to Run a College" with current university President W. Joseph King.

Lyon College President W. Joseph King and former university president Brian C. Mitchell have written a practical guide for new and veteran leaders, How to Run a College.

Learning benefits aside, undergraduate research serves as a recruiting and retention tool, and also is a way to bring in tuition and grant revenue.

Imagine a relay race with no one to hand off the torch?  This is the daunting challenge we face with the future of agricultural education. Nationwide, fewer than one out of ten students are likely to consider agriculture as a career and among agricultural students, one out of ten will actually consider agricultural education as an option.

In 2006, a group of small colleges was at a crossroads.  The grant that the schools had received to pay for the license for its commercial Learning Management System (LMS) had come to an end, and the schools couldn’t afford to continue paying for it.  One attractive alternative was an open source LMS. Even though the hosting and support would require financial resources, the software license for open source is affordable: it’s free.

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