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Ideas realized: How programs for vulnerable students began

University Business, October 2018
GRADUATION GROWTH—Parents in Arkansas Community Colleges’ Career Pathways Initiative complete at twice the rate of other students.
GRADUATION GROWTH—Parents in Arkansas Community Colleges’ Career Pathways Initiative complete at twice the rate of other students.

Arkansas Community Colleges

Arkansas Career Pathways Initiative, 2005

Funding: Pathways is funded by the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

Implementation: Each campus hired case managers to work with low-income parents.

Training: The state trains case managers to work with people experiencing poverty.

Endicott College (Mass.)

Keys to Degrees, 1993

Funding: The university is the main source, along with donations.

Implementation: The college built specialized housing for single parents.

Training: Keys to Degrees staffers receive training and regular guidance from the college’s counseling center as well as from community agencies and statewide family assistance programs.


LINK TO MAIN ARTICLE: Higher ed support for at-risk students


Kennesaw State University (Ga.)

CARE Center, 2013

Funding: The center relies largely on donations.

Implementation: CARE collaborated with housing staff to create an emergency dorm unit for homeless students; departments across campus  help find jobs for students who were struggling financially.

Training: Staff, which includes student employees, go through a daylong orientation and weekly trainings on topics such as new software to keep track of food pantry inventory.

Western Michigan University

Seita Scholars, 2008

Funding: The university funds staff salaries, scholarships and equipment; donations cover study abroad programs and student emergency needs.

Implementation: The school of social work launched the program after FAFSA applications made apparent the number of foster system students.

Training: Using a model developed in-house, faculty and others are trained to support students who have lived in foster care or have suffered adverse childhood experiences.


Matt Zalaznick is senior associate editor of UB.