You are here

Enrollment & Retention

From UB

“Fact-vertising” can give colleges a competitive edge

August, 2016
John L. Gann, Jr., consults, trains, and writes on marketing. He is author of "The Third Lifetime Place: A New Economic Opportunity for College Towns."

Although their leaders might claim otherwise, ratings by U.S. News, Princeton Review and others are of outsized importance to universities today. But what about the many colleges that didn’t rank high with these reviewers? How can they compete with the list-toppers?

International test scores called into question by cheating

August, 2016

Just hours before it was scheduled to be administered in June, the ACT college admission test was canceled in South Korea and Hong Kong. Approximately 5,500 international students were turned away from testing centers after ACT Inc. announced that it had received credible evidence that test materials in these regions had been leaked in advance, thus compromising the integrity of the exams.

The scandal side effect in higher ed

August, 2016

Remember the “Flutie Effect”? That’s the claim that Boston College applications increased as a result of Doug Flutie’s last-second Hail Mary pass that won a football game against the defending champs from the University of Miami. Now we may be seeing the opposite—let’s call it the Scandal Side Effect—where a school’s bad publicity can drive applicants away.

Smaller colleges fuel social mobility

August, 2016
Jeffrey R. Docking is the president of Adrian College in Michigan and the author of "Crisis in Higher Education: A Plan To Save Small Liberal Arts Colleges in America."

Sometimes, well-known propositions lead to predictable conclusions. But not always. Occasionally, they lead to surprises—and even busted myths. Here’s one: Wealthy, private institutions willing to invest large endowments in financial aid for poorer students do the best job of expanding access to higher education.

Open-educational degrees earn $9.8 million boost

August, 2016
Out in front with OER: Tidewater Community College created the first degree program—in business administration—to use only open-educational resources.

A few dozen community colleges will get financial backing to design degree programs based wholly on free, open educational resources (OER) in a sweeping effort to make higher ed more affordable. Full-time community college students spend about $1,300 a year on textbooks, ultimately representing about a third of the cost of their associate degrees.

Sponsored Content

Colleges and universities are under intense pressure to meet enrollment goals, improve retention rates, and shorten time to completion. Predictive analytics can play a crucial role in these efforts by providing insights that guide strategic decision making, improve enrollment management and promote student success.

Colleges and universities are facing a wide variety of business and finance challenges, but many are finding creative solutions. To explore these issues, University Business and Oracle partnered to develop and deploy a recent survey of higher ed business and finance leaders about some of the challenges they face, including rising costs, lack of access to strategic data and changing student expectations.

Institutional research is crucial to providing college and university leadership with the data required to make the most informed strategic decisions, across a broad range of areas including admissions, academics, finance, enrollment, retention, staffing, facilities and more. In order for this research to be effective, however, it is also important to have a strategy and process to translate the data gathered into actionable information.

7/12/2016

While faced with state and federal regulations, an increasingly competitive recruitment environment and intense pressure to contain costs, many colleges and universities have been unable to modernize critical business processes, which could help address key challenges in admissions, finance, and fundraising. Siloed data, manual processes and inefficient workflows can be costly, create security vulnerabilities and prevent institution leaders from understanding the true costs of doing business.

Print marketing is often an opportunity for improvement for higher ed institutions, particularly print mailings.