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Table of Contents

January 2012

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Cover Story

Campus cards have come a long way since their initial uses related to door access and meal plan tracking.


An institutional website is not only often the first contact a prospective student has with a college or university but also a constant landing point for current students, faculty, and staff.

Imagine being a student in a class listening to your professor as she writes on a whiteboard at the front of the room.

Although printer purchases aren’t an everyday occurrence on campuses—or at least the procurement office hopes not—when it’s time to buy new printers, department and purchasing leaders can look to features in new models that can save time and money.

As the name reveals, auxiliary services will never be directly related to the core mission of colleges and universities. But as ever-tightening resources have become the reality for institutions, the revenue-generating possibilities for these departments have become more important than ever.


Last November, Facebook wunderkind Mark Zuckerberg paid a visit to Harvard for the first time since dropping out of sight in 2004.

I am a bit perplexed. No matter how hard I try, I can’t seem to get many listeners on the subject of the need for liberal arts colleges to offer a minor in business and entrepreneurship. Over the past month, I wrote to the presidents at four of the top liberal arts colleges in the U.S.

Tenure-track positions at higher ed institutions are not always the most sought-after jobs on campus. At least, not lately.

Given federal and state regulations­, especially now, there are many policies and procedures related to applying for, awarding, and disbursing aid that can’t be avoided.

Campus Finance News

Education in the New Economy

In light of the current economic conditions and the decreased value of most endowments, many organizations are re-examining their investment strategies. Often overlooked: Spending policies must have not just the proper annual spending amount but also be adequately defined. 

Given the pervasive use of mobile devices, could handheld technology replace campus card programs altogether?

Campus cards have come a long way since their initial uses related to door access and meal plan tracking.

In Every Issue

I’ve had a soundtrack to the events recounted here running through my mind: “Oh the time will come up / When the winds will stop / And the breeze will cease to be breathin’ / Like the stillness in the wind / ‘Fore the hurricane begins / The hour when the ship comes in…”

As this issue of University Business was being prepared to go to press, we were all stopped in our tracks as word came, first via social media and then from conventional news sources, that another shooting had taken place at Virginia Tech.

Behind the News

  • A. Clayton Spencer, vice president for policy at Harvard, has been named the eighth president of Bates College (Maine), effective July 1. Before spending the past 15 years at Harvard, Spencer served as chief education counsel in the U.S. Senate, working under Senator Edward M. Kennedy.

After dropping early admissions programs four years ago, Harvard and Princeton reinstated them this year. They received a large number of applicants, which comes as no surprise, but institutions that never ended their early action programs are experiencing increased numbers, as well.

People can be very sensitive about their social media accounts, as witnessed any time Facebook makes changes to the news feed presentation.

The trend of opening branch campuses overseas is cyclical. When things are good, institutions look outside their borders. When things get bad, institutions tend to retract those tentacles.

The Occupy movement that has swept the nation—and the world—also has a home at many colleges and universities.