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December 2012

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Cover Story

The readers have spoken and for the first time ever, University Business magazine is honoring higher education products and services, in this first annual Readers’ Choice Top Products for 2012.


The readers have spoken and for the first time ever, University Business magazine is honoring higher education products and services, in this first annual Readers’ Choice Top Products for 2012.

As the December issue was going to press mere days after Hurricane Sandy ripped through the Northeast, we were already hearing of colleges and universities in the region beginning to put the pieces back together.

The Myth: If you use open source, you’re on your own.

A college reunion this spring at the  State University of New York at Oswego presented the web-development team an opportunity to build an iPhone app using an open-source software called Kurogo, developed by Modo Labs.

By now, most of us have heard the term “flipped classroom” and learned that the concept is not as aerodynamic as its name. But it is becoming a movement.

Campus safety inspections, which determined the type of environmental health and safety training needed for faculty, staff, students, and researchers, took three staffers four days followed by several days of data input. The school automated the process, cutting the number of hours in half and saving more than $49,000 in annual training and $8,000 in staff and travel costs.

Baldwin Wallace University's IT department was maintaining more than 65 types of hardware with multiple operating systems, which tied them down and made it difficult to be forward-thinking. Through virtualization, BW consolidated its computing and storage infrastructure. Now it has 87 percent fewer servers, and projects a three-year ROI of 194 percent.

UWG's pub and print department was mandated to become self-funded by 2013. The department searched and found equipment that could meet its needs affordably in other departments and shifted them to pub and print. Worker responsibilities were realigned and some student work was offloaded to the students themselves. The efforts generated both productivity improvements and financial savings.

After doubling its number of graduates, Polk needed to automate its graduation applications process. A customized Access database was created with built-in reporting capabilities. An automated download capability was added to link graduate information with the reporting database. The result: Advising hours have been reduced by 1,600 per year and the additional clerical help is no longer needed.

SCU's Clinical Internship program was manually maintained and took hours each day for staff to review credit request forms and patient procedure logs. A new Clinical Internship Portal automated students' schedule. Students and clinical faculty now submit and approve credit and patient tracking forms online, substantially reducing time involved and eliminating paper.


Preached by a select few in academe who saw the recession approach like a speeding freight train, the do-more-with-less philosophy—finally—is gaining traction and critical leadership support in higher education both nationally and abroad. Yes, finally.

With today’s increased focus on college costs, the call for disclosure of information about affordability and outcomes has also been on the rise.

Unintended consequences will frequently result from unique events. Barton College (N.C.) fashioned one of the most dramatic finishes ever played when it won the DII National Men’s Basketball Championship in spring 2007. In the last 45 seconds, a single point guard sank five baskets.

In the wake of a slow, mostly jobless recovery, volatile market conditions have chilled the appetite of multinational corporations for creating permanent, full-time employment opportunities with health benefits.

Campus Finance News

The financial crisis is in the past, more or less, and campuses are looking ahead to a new era for their endowments. But what does this mean? Four years on, we’ve come to grips with the changes wrought by the September 2008 market crash.

In Every Issue

Our institutions of higher learning are populated by experts in a wide range of fields—smart people with strong problem-solving abilities.

It’s nice to see something grow and take on a life of its own. When we first developed the Models of Efficiency program, we honestly didn’t know quite what to expect.

Education Innovators

Behind the News

While community colleges are supposed to be two-year institutions, many students take longer than that to graduate. Some four-year institutions, meanwhile, allow ambitious students to earn a bachelor’s degree in three years.

While social media is a great way to share news with family and friends, students don’t always realize the implications for their ability to secure jobs in the future.

Admissions counselors are busy folks with some pretty important decisions to make, so it’s no wonder colleges and universities are looking for ways to make their lives a little more efficient.

Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Atlantic City, NJ, at the end of October, creating devastation up and down the East Coast. Over 100 people in the U.S. died as a result of the storm and millions were without power for weeks. College and university campuses were not immune to the damage.

  • Dickinson College (Pa.) will be led by a female for the first time when Nancy A. Roseman begins as the college’s 28th president on July 1, 2013. Formerly a dean at Williams College (Mass.) for seven years, she will succeed William G.

While voters across the nation were glued to their screens on election night counting electoral votes, the higher education community was holding its collective breath awaiting the answers on a number of important ballot initiatives, proving this year’s election was truly about more than blue and