Tablet Computers

At-Large: Staff development presentation essentials

Effective recommendations for getting your staff up to speed on online technologies

While digital technologies have become central to our society and our lives in higher education, the continuing development of the internet, mobile phone applications, and social media brings the need for up-to-date professional development. Indeed, standing still with digital technology means we are falling behind, and your staff needs continuing opportunities to evaluate and implement new online options.

Abilene Christian University Mobilizes Learning with Smartphones

ACU commits to mobile, delivers advanced applications supported by an Alcatel-Lucent network infrastructure

Integrating mobile devices in learning is getting to be old hat in Abilene, Texas.

As early as 2008, Abilene Christian University (ACU) was the first university in the United States to provide each incoming student with an Apple iPhone or iPod Touch. Each of the nearly 4,800 students on the ACU campus located 180 miles west of Dallas can access course calendars, campus maps, receive homework alerts, security alerts, and answer in-class surveys and quizzes, among other ACUdeveloped web applications.

Test Driving Mobile

Today’s higher education web strategy hinges on device agnosticism—and requires content synergy between desktop, tablet, and mobile views.

A college reunion this spring at the  State University of New York at Oswego presented the web-development team an opportunity to build an iPhone app using an open-source software called Kurogo, developed by Modo Labs. The app was a hit, with 30 percent of the 2,000 or so reunion attendees downloading it to share photos and stay on top of events over the course of three days.

An App for Admissions

Admissions counselors are busy folks with some pretty important decisions to make, so it’s no wonder colleges and universities are looking for ways to make their lives a little more efficient. At the University of New Haven (Conn.), this help is coming in the form of iPads and an app called Matchbox, which allows counselors to review application materials on the go.

What's New: Tablets, Laptops, Desktops

 Affordable Android

The ZTE Optik 3G Android tablet from Sprint is an e-reader, media player, and portable computing device. The 7-inch touchscreen display has a WXGA 1280x800 resolution and pinch-to-zoom technology and operates on the Android 3.2 Honeycomb system with a 1.2GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon processor. The 7.6 inches tall, 4.7 inches wide tablet, weighing less than 1 pound, costs as low as $99.99.

Tech Spotlight: Tablets, Laptops, Desktops

Computing trends, today and tomorrow

Computer platforms are broadening on campus as colleges and universities invite students to use a variety of tablets, laptops, and desktops in mobile and traditional learning environments. Device choices expand as the emphasis is on apps over hardware.

Interactivity, Data Mining, and the Future of Digital Signage

Considering content and the possibilities of DOOH

If you were to travel 10 years into the future and walk onto a college campus, what would you expect digital signage to look like? I’m not sure what it will look like, but what I do know is that my two young sons will want to interact with it. Steve Jobs left me a legacy of listening to endless fire truck videos; clips of animated cars, trucks, and trains speaking in German, Dutch, and Japanese; and video updates of the latest in dancing robots (“bebots,” as my 18-month-old calls them).

Booksellers Respond to Textbook Slump

In this digital age, at a time when everybody is tightening their belts, it should come as no surprise that students are buying fewer textbooks. How many fewer? Two recent surveys show that 70 percent of students polled at the University of California, Riverside say the rising costs of higher ed have caused them to skip buying textbooks altogether. And findings from a 2011 Pew survey, “The Digital Revolution and Higher Education,” indicate that 62 percent of college presidents anticipate more than half of textbooks used by their undergraduates will be digital within 10 years.

What's New

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Take II Tablets

After years of false starts, true tablet computers may actually be ready for primetime.

Back in 2003, University Business ran a cover story that asked, "Is the Tablet PC the Future of Higher Education?"

It was an exciting time, when computers were faster and more powerful than ever, and everyone was still just scratching the surface of how to interact with the internet.

On college and university campuses across the country, people were talking tablets, and students, professors, technologists, and administrators alike thought we might be witnessing the next generation of computers.

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