Student Retention

Stopping Out, Stepping Back In

How institutions are helping adult learners return to school

In this tough job climate, a college degree is more important than ever. That’s why the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) is helping students who’ve put their education on hold before completing a degree—or “stopped out”—return to finish their bachelor’s degrees. Stop-outs are different from drop-outs in that they don’t want to leave school.
Grad TX aims to connect the 3 million adults over 25 in the state who have some college credit and no degree.

Seven tips for starting a student success coaching program with an outside partner

One proven way to improve retention is by supplementing traditional academic advising with student success coaching. Student success coaching helps students fit school into life and life into school while building up the skills they need to be successful, including study skills, time management, and stress management. As institutions explore the possibility of starting coaching programs to improve student outcomes, there are several challenges they will face.

Managing the financial aid gap

Strategies to help students attend that go beyond increasing institutional grants or reducing price

Fewer and fewer institutions are meeting students’ financial need. Per The College Board’s “Trends in College Pricing 2013,” the average net tuition and fee price for students attending four-year public institutions increased by an estimated $1,180 (in 2013 dollars) between 2009-10 and 2013-14.

Meeting the Financial Literacy Imperative

Helping students understand their debt and teaching money management skills should be a priority for higher ed institutions

As the average student loan debt rises, financial literacy is essential for graduates to successfully manage their post-college lives. Some institutions are going beyond just educating students about tuition payment plans and federal financial aid options. Others, like Creighton University (Neb.) are offering full financial literacy programs to educate students on money management during the college years, and more importantly, beyond.

Kylie Lacey's picture

Let racial preference ruling start an intelligent debate

The Supreme Court’s narrow decision Monday keeping alive a challenge to racial preferences in admissions at the University of Texas may open the way for a healthy shift in the debate from legal abstractions to whether these preferences are working as advertised.

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Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Eying graduation, colleges revamp remedial programs

Remedial programs across the country are getting overhauled by educators and lawmakers hoping to keep more two- and four-year college students on track for graduation.

Eying graduation, colleges revamp remedial programs

Remedial programs across the country are getting overhauled by educators and lawmakers hoping to keep more two- and four-year college students on track for graduation.

The changes come as research shows that while many community college students are made to take—and pay for—at least one remedial course before they start compiling credits, those who take the courses are more likely to leave school without earning a diploma.

Kylie Lacey's picture

Recent college graduates leave New England at higher rates than other parts of US

New England ranks lowest of any US region for retaining college students after graduation, according to a new study by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. And one reason why may be the availability of jobs, suggested a policy brief prepared by the bank’s New England Public Policy Center.

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Kylie Lacey's picture

Florida colleges to drop remedial classes for thousands

Almost 200,000 students, including recent high-school graduates, had to take refresher classes in math, reading or writing last school year. Some needed extra help in all three subjects, adding a semester or two or more — and hundreds of dollars in tuition — onto their educational plans.

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