Security

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Posting a Threat

Jared Loughner, who was sentenced to life in prison without parole for killing six people and wounding 11 others, including former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords in a Tucson, Ariz. rampage last year, posted a YouTube video threat against Pima Community College. This event showed all colleges large and small the importance of recognizing and responding to threats of violence made via social media.

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Ann McClure's picture

Hampden-Sydney College Reports Post-Election Unrest

About 40 students at Hampden-Sydney College shouted racial slurs, threw bottles and set off fireworks outside the Minority Student Union within minutes after President Barack Obama's re-election, officials of the tiny, all-male school said Thursday.

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Ann McClure's picture

USC Announces New Security Measures In Shooting Aftermath

In the wake of last week’s shooting on campus, USC on Tuesday announced a new set of heightened security measures, including visitor restrictions and mandatory identification checks on anyone seeking to enter the main campus between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m.

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Ann McClure's picture

BYU-Idaho Officials Reaffirm Campus Weapons Ban

Administrators at Brigham Young University-Idaho are standing behind campus policy banning guns from campus — even if a student has a concealed weapons permit.

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The Campus Grapevine: A Cautionary Tale

Situations promoting campus alerts can be disruptive, but also informative. The University at Buffalo’s Joseph Brennan recalls an incident where a student reported seeing a man enter the campus library while carrying what appeared to be a rifle. Immediately upon hearing the report, officials issued an alert using the university’s system from Rave Mobile Safety. Recipients of the message were advised to stay away from the area, and the building was searched.

Security: Show and Tell?

Certain security measures should be visible, but for others, it’s better when they’re less obvious or even hidden. Here’s some perspective on which the campus community should spot—and which they’d better not.

In an era when higher education leaders are more mindful than ever of potential threats to the safety of those living, learning, and working on campus, security planning has reached new levels of complexity. Few would argue that at least some security measures should be highly visible to the campus community. Just as in society at large (think of the police cruiser parked in the median of a busy highway), the right level of visibility can prevent campus crime or violence.

Can Schools Proactively Monitor Social Media for Threats?

The search-based filtering techniques used by social media monitoring tools rely on spotting a specific set of keywords, including the name of the school. Since people can make valid threats using words outside that list, monitoring tools could never identify threats comprehensively.

Posting A Threat

Recognizing and responding to threats of violence made via social media

In the wake of the Colorado movie theater shooting and noting the social media clues that appeared beforehand, college and university leaders are taking threats of violence posted to social media very seriously.

Case in point: Kent State University (Ohio) charged 19-year-old student William Koberna with a felony charge of inducing panic and a misdemeanor charge of aggravated menacing for tweeting, “I’m shooting up your school ASAP” and threats to the college president. Koberna’s tweets came five days after the Colorado massacre.

Ann McClure's picture

UCA Investigates Break-In, Theft At Math And Technology Building

Police at the University of Central Arkansas are investigating a break-in at the school — this time at the mathematics and technology building where someone stole books and riffled through desks Thursday night or early Friday morning.

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Ann McClure's picture

ConnectYard Announces New Upgrade Program for Blackboard Learn Customers

K12 and Higher Ed institutions using Blackboard Learn™ can now send emergency notifications via Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, text messaging and email for free

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