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The search-based filtering techniques used by social media monitoring tools rely on spotting a specific set of keywords, including the name of the school. Since people can make valid threats using words outside that list, monitoring tools could never identify threats comprehensively.

In the wake of the Colorado movie theater shooting and noting the social media clues that appeared beforehand, college and university leaders are taking threats of violence posted to social media very seriously.

Case in point: Kent State University (Ohio) charged 19-year-old student William Koberna with a felony charge of inducing panic and a misdemeanor charge of aggravated menacing for tweeting, “I’m shooting up your school ASAP” and threats to the college president. Koberna’s tweets came five days after the Colorado massacre.

Changes are coming to colleges and universities as administrators look to increase efficiencies in the way campuses are secured and building operations are managed.

Today’s campus security director already has his or her hands full keeping pace with new facilities and a growing student population. As security takes on increased importance, campuses are adding more surveillance cameras, access control, intrusion, fire alarms, visitor management, emergency notification systems, intercoms and other equipment.

When it comes to notifying your students, faculty, and staff about important campus issues and events, you can’t rely on just texting or email. Effective notification platforms also use voice recordings, Facebook and Twitter posts, RSS feeds, and digital signage. But how do you implement a single, centralized notification system that offers connectivity and control of all these communication channels?

As in any community, there will always be incidents of crime on campus. While the cause is unknown, in many categories of campus crime, the number of arrests went down between 2007 and 2009. Add unified security systems to the mix, and response to crime can be swifter and the number of victims can potentially be minimized even further.

The university’s unified security initiative­—which is helping to ensure that information quickly reaches students, faculty, and staff anywhere on campus so that they can take appropriate action—is being implemented by Director of Emergency Management Scott G. Burnotes. His team took advantage of campus fire alarms and their ability to be used to communicate in any type of emergency.

When Scott G. Burnotes arrived at the University of Miami, he found multiple, separate systems for emergency notifications. A third-party vendor handled texting, emailing, and phone calls; sirens had been set up around campus; and some web-based notifications were utilized.

“Their focus was on continuing to build a multimodal method of communication for all types of emergencies,” recalls Burnotes, Miami’s director of emergency management.

security cameras


The lecture had run late, and on top of that the sophomore biology major had joined a couple of friends for a cup of coffee afterward to kick around the speaker’s provocative ideas. It was well after midnight when he made it back across campus to his residence hall, where he noticed a side door that was ajar.

While a federation might sound like something out of Star Trek, it’s actually the next big step in identity management.

“I think where the real action is today is federation,” says Rodney J. Petersen, managing director of Washington office and senior government relations officer for Educause. “That is not just allowing students and staff into a single system, but allowing them to log in to a different system or a government system.”

Modern technology has a lot of upsides. On the downside is the fact that you need an ID and password to access most of it. Keeping your own logins straight is hard enough; keeping them straight for thousands of people on a college campus is even harder.

First things first. This story is not about the Second Amendment of The United States Constitution, which grants citizens the right to keep and bear arms. Every state recognizes that right and, at the state level, 49 of them include a provision for licensed owners to carry concealed handguns in public. Instead, this story is about the debate over whether that right should extend to carrying firearms onto the country’s colleges and universities.