MOOCs

Ann McClure's picture

How California’s Online Education Pilot Will End College As We Know It

Today, the largest university system in the world, the California State University system, announced a pilot for $150 lower-division online courses at one of its campuses — a move that spells the end of higher education as we know it.

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Ann McClure's picture

U Of California Regents Pledge To Expand Online Education In Next Few Years

The regents are under pressure from Gov. Jerry Brown to offer more online classes to provide wider access to college education and keep costs down.

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A College Experience You Can Count On

A wristwatch metaphor for higher ed in the age of MOOCs

Will residential liberal arts colleges follow the path of the wristwatch? I sure hope so. With all of the talk about MOOCs, online instruction, and game-based learning models, many of us working at residential liberal arts colleges are uncertain about our future. The reports are scaring us into conversations about fundamentally restructuring—perhaps even abandoning what we do and how we do it.

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Seven Trends that Will Shape Digital and Web in Higher Ed in 2013

UB's Internet Technology writer Karine Joly looks back on the last seven years to make seven technology-driven predictions for higher ed in the coming year.

Ann McClure's picture

California to Give Web Courses a Big Trial

Udacity, a Silicon Valley start-up that creates online college classes, will announce a deal on Tuesday with San Jose State University for a series of remedial and introductory courses.

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Ann McClure's picture

U. Va. Branching Out With Online Classes

On Tuesday, Philip Zelikow will hold the opening session of his spring-term course "The Modern World: Global History Since 1760" at the University of Virginia.

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Digital and Web in Higher Ed

Seven trends that will shape 2013

Can you believe it? I’ve been writing this column about digital marketing in higher education for seven years.

So much has happened since February 2006. Together we’ve witnessed the first blips of Web 2.0, the development—and demise—of many social networking platforms, and the rising tide of new media that later turned into the social media tsunami. Over the past seven years, we’ve also seen the end of the desktop browser compatibility war, the start of the battle for the mobile and responsive web, and growing interest for digital analytics in higher education.

Ann McClure's picture

Higher Ed Leaders Must Lead Online

We are witnessing a historic transformation of how students learn, teachers teach, and universities are organized.

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Tim Goral's picture

Colleges Resist Free Online Courses, Undercutting Promise

A new study says U.S. colleges are resisting free online courses, partly because there is little revenue.

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