MOOCs

Former Barnard president stresses importance of liberal arts

A Q&A with Judith Shapiro.

Judith Shapiro, former president and professor of anthropology at Barnard College in New York City from 1994 to 2008, had been “happily retired” before assuming the leadership role at the Teagle Foundation in July. The New York-based foundation’s grant-making is focused on improving undergraduate student learning in the arts and sciences.

Networking supports MOOC success

Where to turn for ideas and inspiration in launching and managing MOOCs

Michigan State University’s first massive open online course—Metropolitan Agriculture Value Creation—attracted 400 people from around the globe interested in learning about new ways to produce food in urban areas. Launched in March 2012, the course was built on a WordPress website and students communicated with one another via Facebook and Twitter.

Colleges and universities begin to assess the benefits of MOOCs

Higher educatioin finds that a primary benefit of MOOCs is data that can be used to improve teaching methods

When Cornell University joined the edX consortium last May, the impetus came not only from professors who wanted to offer MOOCs but also from prospective students who were asking admissions officers about whether the university provided these courses.

“They were hearing from high school students that if you are going to be a modern university, you have to participate in this,” says Joe Burns, Cornell’s dean of faculty and member of a committee that considered whether the university should affiliate with a consortium.

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Who’s going to pay for MOOCs? Anyone?

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have undeniable appeal: they can support hundreds of thousands of students, are accessible to all, are taught by top faculty at prestigious universities, and, of course, are free…at least for now. But MOOCs still have operating costs and providers hope one day to turn a profit. How much will these courses be worth?

Who’s going to pay for MOOCs? Anyone?

Free MOOC platforms still have operating costs and providers will one day hope to turn a profit. How much will these courses be worth?

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have undeniable appeal: they can support hundreds of thousands of students, are accessible to all, are taught by top faculty at prestigious universities, and, of course, are free…at least for now.

Matt Zalaznick's picture

The MOOC that roared

How Georgia Tech’s new, super-cheap online master’s degree could radically change American higher education.

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Matt Zalaznick's picture

Case Western Reserve University's free online courses exceeded expectations

Tens of thousands of people from around the world participated in Case Western Reserve University’s first free online classes, but the two professors involved also learned something from them.

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Matt Zalaznick's picture

Coursera hits 4 million students -- and triples funding to $43 million

Coursera founders Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng don’t think small. Their Palo Alto, Calif., online-education company is less than two years old, yet it already has attracted more than 4 million student signups. Now Coursera has raised $43 million in fresh venture capital, tripling its cash available for growth.

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SPOCs may provide what MOOCs can’t

The acronym may be new, but the SPOC concept isn’t

It’s hard to follow higher education news these days without seeing a reference to MOOCs. The online learning platforms from edX, Coursera, Udacity, and others were launched to great fanfare over the last two years. Proponents praise them for their potential to change education, while critics chalk them up as more hype than hope.

Matt Zalaznick's picture

Online classes fuel a campus debate

The announcement last month that Coursera, which offers free college classes online, had signed agreements with state universities enrolling more than a million students made it plain that such courses, virtually unheard-of two years ago, are now part of the higher education mainstream.

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