MOOCs

Accessibility from a distance in higher education

Today’s digital learning platforms come with varying degrees of accessibility for students with disabilities

The technological revolution sweeping higher education may not be carrying all students with it equally. MOOCs, lecture capture, and other digital platforms are being designed with varying degrees of accessibility for students with mobility restrictions, hearing and visual impairments, and learning disabilities.

Accessibility features embedded in lecture capture

Lecture capture platforms can accommodate human-generated closed captions, and are compatible with screen-reading software

Unlike MOOCs, lecture capture platforms are used widely in for-credit courses. Providers of the technology have built in many accessibility features in the past several years.

Lecture capture platforms designed by Echo360, Panopto, and Sonic Foundry, for instance, can all accommodate human-generated closed captions, and are compatible with screen-reading software used by students with visual impairments. Students who cannot use a mouse can use keyboard commands to navigate the platforms.

Matt Zalaznick's picture

Latin America becoming fertile ground for online university courses

Lost in the debate about online learning is its impact in far-flung regions of the globe, places like the electrical engineering department at the University of El Salvador.

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Preparing Your Campus for the Future of Academic Video

Academic video will soon become an integral part of the higher ed learning experience

“Generation C” is demanding video in all aspects of their lives, including in their learning experiences. Universities ought to harness the power of academic video not only to meet these expectations, but to realize the power of lecture capture, personalized education, and flipped classrooms. In this web seminar hosted by Sonic Foundry vice president Sean Brown and originally presented on August 20, 2013, JD Solomon of University Business presented some findings from a new white paper about how academic video is at a tipping point and what its future looks like.

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Data mining the MOOCs

The exploding popularity of MOOCs is beginning to open up a mother lode of data about prospective students that colleges and universities can use for marketing and recruitment purposes. MOOCs are still in their infancy stages, and the concept of leveraging their reach as a data-rich marketing vehicle for the institution is even newer. But it’s beginning to gain a foothold.

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Higher education is getting flattened

In this UBTech 2013 featured session, Mark Greenfield, director of the office of web services at University of Buffalo, explores how the forces of technology and globalization will redefine higher education. He provides guidance not only on how to survive, but how to thrive in this new paradigm.

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Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Are MOOCs the utopia of affordable higher ed, or just the latest fad?

MOOCs were promoted as the disruptive innovation that would make higher education better, cheaper and more widely available. Not only would they be free and disconnected from a university, but instead of enrolling 100 students, like a typical lecture course, they would enroll hundreds of thousands of students.

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Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Google teams up with edX to build a YouTube for free online courses

Udacity co-founder and CEO Sebastian Thrun and California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom have announced the Open Education Alliance, a consortium of online organizations dedicated to closing the skills gap, developing standards for career readiness and providing the content that will help get students ready for the workforce.

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Data mining the MOOCs

The massive enrollment in MOOCs is yielding a treasure-trove of information for everything from marketing to course development

The exploding popularity of MOOCs is beginning to open up a mother lode of data about prospective students that colleges and universities can use for marketing and recruitment purposes.

MOOCs are still in their infancy stages, and the concept of leveraging their reach as a data-rich marketing vehicle for the institution is even newer. But it’s beginning to gain a foothold.

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

The evolution of online classes through the lens of one professor

Having taught my first online course to students at Borough of Manhattan Community College in September 2001, the events of 9/11 showed that online classes could have a profound and utterly unanticipated capacity for something transformative that went far beyond traditional teaching and learning. But my concern about MOOCs is that, with all they offer, they don’t address the learning needs of the students who need them most.

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