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Lecture Capture

When scientists embark on a mission to provide free educational materials on a global scale, video becomes the most critical piece, especially with the Global Educational Outreach for Science Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) initiative. Established in 2006 by the 1996 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Sir Harold Kroto, GEOSET produces educational content for student class projects, science experiments, teacher support, supplements for a digital CV and many more productions. It also connects to around 50 partner institutions and organizations around the world.

8/18/2015

When scientists embark on a mission to provide free educational materials on a global scale, video becomes the most critical piece, especially with the Global Educational Outreach for Science Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) initiative. Established in 2006 by the 1996 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Sir Harold Kroto, GEOSET produces educational content for student class projects, science experiments, teacher support, supplements for a digital CV and many more productions. It also connects to around 50 partner institutions and organizations around the world.

No one in the world does automated lecture capture bigger or better than the University of Leeds. Launched in the fall of 2014, the university successfully deployed more than 250 rooms at once. In the first four months alone, they created 16,500 videos that were viewed 185,000 times – and those numbers have been multiplying ever since. The initiative has catapulted Leeds – chartered in 1904 – into a modern, digital campus, and has had immediate positive impact on teaching and learning. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on June 23, 2015, Neil Morris, the Director of Digital Learning at Leeds, described the project, from planning to practice, and how the institution launched the world’s largest automated lecture capture initiative with Mediasite as the foundation.

6/23/2015

No one in the world does automated lecture capture bigger or better than the University of Leeds. Launched in the fall of 2014, the university successfully deployed more than 250 rooms at once. In the first four months alone, they created 16,500 videos that were viewed 185,000 times – and those numbers have been multiplying ever since.

The initiative has catapulted Leeds – chartered in 1904 – into a modern, digital campus, and has had immediate positive impact on teaching and learning.

Faculty and students at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania have been using Mediasite technology for six years to record lectures for flipped instruction, classroom projects and special guests. The events are recorded and automatically fed into a video management and creation platform, My Mediasite. Some classrooms are equipped with multiple cameras to capture a fully immersive, multi-angle video experience to deepen engagement, whether the video is live or on-demand.

Colleges and universities must consider students' privacy and other issues when lectures are recorded.

While the benefits of lecture capture and the flipped classroom model have caught widespread attention in higher ed, it is crucial to note its risks—particularly in the area of privacy and copyright violations.

Texas Tech faculty can escape to a quiet recording studio with good lighting and acoustics, as well as tech support just steps away, when they need to record lessons for distance learning or a flipped classroom model.

For an increasing number of faculty members, class prep has gone high tech. It’s not about simply reviewing notes and planning course exercises. It also involves stepping in front of a video camera. Whether it’s for distance learning programs or flipped classrooms, colleges and universities now need faculty who are able and willing to teach on camera.

Following are 10 ways to increase the odds of engaging and connecting with students through video.

Panopto's lecture capture platform, like many others, includes captions for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

The technological revolution sweeping higher education may not be carrying all students with it equally. MOOCs, lecture capture, and other digital platforms are being designed with varying degrees of accessibility for students with mobility restrictions, hearing and visual impairments, and learning disabilities.

Unlike MOOCs, lecture capture platforms are used widely in for-credit courses. Providers of the technology have built in many accessibility features in the past several years.

Lecture capture platforms designed by Echo360, Panopto, and Sonic Foundry, for instance, can all accommodate human-generated closed captions, and are compatible with screen-reading software used by students with visual impairments. Students who cannot use a mouse can use keyboard commands to navigate the platforms.

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