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For institutions looking to grow and expand their student population, a primary challenge is ensuring that administrative services keep pace with the flood of new students. When the Texas A&M University (TAMU) College of Engineering committed to doubling enrollment to 25,000 students by the year 2025, they also committed a concentrated effort to reengineer key business processes for operational efficiency, and to provide the highest quality of services to students.

New Hampshire college partners with GovConnection to fulfill its  mission of equipping teacher candidates with the right technology

The majority of the 500 students in Granite State College’s School of Education are already employed in K12 schools across New Hampshire. 

Nicole Nesrsta

The notion of doing more with less—less budget, less time, fewer resources—has been the mantra in many IT departments for some time. But the institution leaders gathering at this year’s EDUCAUSE Annual Conference are now more concerned with: “How can I do something different to get more value with the resources I have?”

In just three years, enrollment at Lone Star Community College grew by about 50 percent. The six-campus system, located in the north Houston metro area, now has more than 95,000 students and has experienced explosive data growth, as well—from 40 terabytes to 1.6 petabytes.

In today’s 24/7, always-on world, students, faculty and other key stakeholders expect institutions of higher education to be on the cutting edge of technology. As CIO of Western Oregon University (WOU), a vibrant campus of 4,992 undergraduates and 1,066 graduate students with our main campus in Monmouth, I know that when it comes to technology, leading universities must deliver unsurpassed learning capabilities that extend well beyond the classroom.

Sanjay Srivastava

Coding has become a part of how basic literacy will be defined for the next generation. We predict that the number of opportunities available in coding-related jobs is only going to grow as more and more of society moves to digital platforms. Coding instruction has already extended beyond Computer Science into Statistics, Computational Biology and Business Administration.


As more business documents are converted to digital files – and mobile information access becomes a way of life for the students, faculty and staff of the millennial generation – innovative institutions are going beyond simple paperless operations. They are exploring creative ways to automate, optimize and transform business processes for student success and operational efficiency.


Colleges and universities are under intense pressure to boost retention and completion rates, and national research has shown that students who are highly engaged on campus are more apt to graduate. By using student data and predictive analytics effectively, institutions can improve retention rates by identifying students needing early intervention and proactively helping them succeed.

Higher education institutions consistently face pressure to satisfy the computing, storage and network requirements of their campus power users, the research scientists. A variety of technological trends are also putting added pressure on an institution’s infrastructure. With the advent of cloud computing, and public infrastructure as a service offerings available with the swipe of a credit card, how do higher ed IT departments keep up with the demand of these power users to stay relevant and provide high value services on demand?


At Niagara College in Ontario, Canada, a new state-of-the-art Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre is providing unique opportunities for students, faculty and local businesses to collaborate in innovative ways. 3D printing plays an important role in a variety of projects at the Centre, providing students with valuable real-world experience, faculty with professional development and research opportunities, and local advanced manufacturing businesses with solutions to a variety of challenges.