Financial Aid

Lauren Williams's picture

TG Financial Literacy Program

This program provides materials that allow college financial aid offices to develop high-quality financial literacy training events with minimal effort. The program’s mini-modules present material in small chunks of content on a wide range of topics, including managing credit, saving and investing, building spending plans, understanding employee compensation and meeting college costs.

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

GW misrepresented admissions and financial aid policy for years

The George Washington University admitted publicly that it puts hundreds of undergraduate applicants on its waitlist each year because they cannot pay GW's tuition. Administrators now say the admissions process has always factored in financial need. But that contradicts messaging from the admissions and financial aid offices that have regularly attested that the university remained need-blind.

Read more »

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

University of Nevada, Reno launches financial literacy program

In an effort to boost students’ financial prowess, the University of Nevada, Reno has implemented a free online program called SALT. It was designed by American Student Assistance to make students and recent alumni more financially savvy.

Read more »

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

How financial aid admins can help curb crippling student debt

Despite news headlines depicting students with six-figure debt levels, the average student borrower’s debt burden is not necessarily devastating. Among graduates in 2011 who borrowed to pay for higher education, the average loan debt at graduation was $26,600. Only 1.5 percent of borrowers owed $100,000 or more in 2007-2008.

Debt defense: How financial aid administrators can help curb cases of crippling student debt

Aid administrators should be able to set borrowing levels for students

Despite jarring news headlines depicting students with six-figure debt levels, the average student borrower’s debt burden is not necessarily devastating.

Among graduates in 2011 who borrowed to pay for higher education, the average loan debt at graduation was $26,600, according to the Project on Student Debt. Only 1.5 percent of borrowers owed $100,000 or more in 2007-2008, according to an analysis by Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of Edvisors Network.

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Washington & Lee offers free tuition to those who qualify

Through a new financial initiative, administrators at Washington & Lee University, a small private college in Lexington, Va., said that, starting next fall, they will guarantee free tuition for undergraduate students whose family income is lower than $75,000.

Read more »

Meeting the Financial Literacy Imperative

Helping students understand their debt and teaching money management skills should be a priority for higher ed institutions

As the average student loan debt rises, financial literacy is essential for graduates to successfully manage their post-college lives. Some institutions are going beyond just educating students about tuition payment plans and federal financial aid options. Others, like Creighton University (Neb.) are offering full financial literacy programs to educate students on money management during the college years, and more importantly, beyond.

Pages