Diversity

Assistive Technology U: Breaking Down Barriers for the Disabled

What’s hot for today’s engineering students? What’s really hot is the emerging field of assistive technologies. Combining professional career fields like robotics, electrical and mechanical engineering, computer science, and occupational health, a new breed of polytechnic programs are serving up state-of-the-art, adaptive technology courses for civically engaged engineering students who want to make the world a better place for the disabled.

Access Matters

Ensuring that preserving access to higher education becomes part of a national dialogue
 

Covering the Shadow Uninsured

What institutions can do to help ensure the health of their student bodies
 

ALL YEAR LONG, BUT THROUGHOUT the colder months in particular, health care needs inevitably arise. But for college students, particularly those in traditionally underserved minority groups, access to health care may be as slippery as the roads they come to school on.

Removing Educational Roadblocks for Disabled Veterans

For a growing number of veterans, educational benefits require more than just college tuition assistance.

For decades, the G.I. Bill has been a primary motivator for young men and women to enlist in the U.S. military, and Veterans Administration statistics show an increasing number of veterans are taking advantage of educational benefits. For many young people not necessarily able to afford college immediately out of high school, the promise of a free education is an opportunity too good to pass up. Yet, there is a large disparity between the educational benefits provided to veterans through the G.I. Bill and the full cost of attaining a four-year degree.

The Changing Chaplaincy

The role of religious leaders on campus as the spiritual needs of students evolve.
 

Across Generational Lines

Making an intergenerational living complex work
 

Coming to Terms

How mediation can resolve campus disputes without litigation
 

DO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING campus disputes sound familiar to you?

--An academic department chair is struggling with warring factions among the faculty who do not get along and are engaged in petty in fighting.

Prepping Employees for Their Golden Years

Part one of a two-part column on retirement planning at colleges and universities
 

A New Admissions Gambit

The star players at some universities aren't on the athletic field.

Rugged four-hour practices, aggressive recruiting, fierce competition, and the non-stop pursuit of national championships are what you would expect to find on the campuses of college basketball and football powerhouses. But those same elements are in full view at the considerably smaller University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and University of Texas at Dallas, where the world-class chess teams are generating national attention, giving new meaning to sports scholarships, and offering novel ways to recruit high-caliber students.

The Face of Diversity

Everybody is talking about "diversity": communities, businesses, political leaders, and institutions of learning. It is the new buzzword used in the quest to raise socio-economic and political consciousness in a global society that must learn to live, work, and play together. But the effectiveness of diversity depends on the sincerity of its delivery.

Pages