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Case Studies

Complying with recordkeeping laws and information security requirements can be made easier with electronic document management. This is critical for higher ed institutions that are struggling to do more with less. This web seminar, originally broadcast on April 22, 2014, featured leaders from the Washington Student Achievement Council, a state agency working with colleges and universities to expand access to higher education in Washington.

When the academic services office at the University of Oklahoma’s College of Arts & Science first deployed Laserfiche’s ECM technology, it had two initial business objectives for moving to a digital format: to protect student records against a natural disaster, and to serve its students in the most efficiently possible way.

The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the United States. To reduce costs across the board, Texas A&M System’s procurement office advocates the use of shared services. In 2010, the university system selected a preferred vendor for all new ECM implementations.

It wasn’t long ago that most of what went on behind the scenes at Oklahoma Christian University (OC) was paper-based and cumbersome. Realizing they needed to do a better job of meeting students’ expectations, OC’s Director of Student Financial Services, Clint LaRue, collaborated with Vice President of Information Technology John Hermes, found a way to move the department into the 21st century and provide better customer service.

The University of Central Florida (UCF) Police Department, located on the university’s main campus in Orlando, has 61 sworn and 36 civilian personnel tasked with maintaining campus safety and security. It’s Carla Markx’s job to manage all the records, reports, and evidence flowing through the department. Markx, coordinator, statistical research, records/property & evidence manager for the department, doesn’t tackle this chore alone. She’s assisted by four employees in the Records Division and one in the Property and Evidence Division.

It was a near-miss, potential disaster that galvanized the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Oklahoma (OU) into taking action, says Dr. Rhonda Dean-Kyncl, assistant dean for college academic services. Her office staff is responsible for safely handling the entire academic histories of more than 8,000 students.

The USC Contracts and Grants department was struggling to maintain efficiencies in the face of a paper flow situation that threatened to engulf them. Exacerbating the problem was that to facilitate agreements and arrive at resolutions, a great deal of interaction and information-sharing with other campus entities was required.

Lauri Reilly, accounts payable manager at the Chancellor’s Office for California State University (CSU), distinctly recalls the moment she fell in love—with Laserfiche, that is. One of the first tasks she tackled upon her arrival to the office four years ago was preparing 1099 forms for vendors. “In the past, reconciling differences between the 1099 and total payments to a vendor took forever,” she says. “It was just amazing to me that I could sit at my desk and actually see the images in Laserfiche, and make an immediate determination whether or not a particular invoice was reportable without having to get up and search through files.”

The academic advisors working at University of Oklahoma’s College of Arts & Sciences were operating behind the times. While the students were using technology in every aspect of their lives, the college’s academic services office—which handles more than 8,000 student records—was still hopelessly ensnared in a traditional paper system, says Rhonda Dean-Kyncl, assistant dean for academic services.

Although the medical school’s old system of managing records with paper spreadsheets and custom databases was working fine, keeping things current did depend on programmer availability, says Monica Baccardax, IT project manager for the Faculty of Medicine at Dalhousie University Medical School, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. And even when all systems were “go,” staying on top of the paper flow was time-consuming.