Campus Life

Matt Zalaznick's picture

How to green the ivory towers of higher education

University of Washington president believes that, when it comes to sustainability, universities must turn themselves inside out -- taking more of the discoveries and innovations from their scholars, researchers, and students, and bringing them to the broader global community.

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Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Trustees OK financing for new U of Florida dorm

A new dormitory designed with special features to accommodate students with "multiple handicap challenges" is one step closer to becoming a reality at the University of Florida. The UF board of trustees unanimously authorized a $25 million finance plan for the 82,000-square-foot, 255-bed dormitory. It must go to the Florida Board of Governors for final approval.

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Campuses break ground on housing, classrooms over the summer

Howard University's (D.C.) $107 million housing project is slated for August 2014 completion.

Campus Apartments broke ground on an estimated $107 million housing project at Howard University (D.C.). in March. The 1,360-bed project, slated for August 2014 completion, includes two on-campus facilities that will bring underclassmen closer to the campus core. The residences will offer two-person semisuites, social and study lounges, game rooms, and laundry facilities, as well as independent apartment units for faculty, staff, and guests.

Location, variety take priority in meal planning

How savvy administrators make strategic decisions about the whole campus dining experience—because meal planning isn’t just about the food

Only one-third of 3,400 U.S. college students say they’re satisfied with their meal plans, found a survey by food industry research firm Technomic. But schools are finding that to address the problem, they need to go beyond simply improving what winds up on diners’ plates.

Kylie Lacey's picture

Colleges begin to define missions for New York's tax-free plan

The New York State Legislature approved Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan to give new employers and their employees a decade of tax-free living if they locate on or near college campus.

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Eight questions to ask student activists about the fossil fuel divestment campaign

How colleges and universities can turn Fossil Free campaign meetings into teachable moments

A teachable moment is something all good educators welcome. It is a critical time during which learning about a particular topic or idea becomes easiest. The Fossil Free divestment campaign at post secondary institutions across North America provides superb teachable moments for educators.

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Is fossil fuel divestment a wise move for university endowments?

Momentum for divestment of fossil fuel from university endowments grew slowly all spring. In late April, students at Rhode Island School of Design staged a sit-in to draw attention to the cause.
Then, during a nationwide Day of Action on May 2, student groups at more than 60 colleges and universities hosted events pushing for fossil fuel divestment.

Is Fossil Fuel Divestment a Wise Move?

Making the case for and against stripping endowments of fossil fuel investments

Stop Feeding the Monster. End the Coal Age. Divest the West. Sandy Says: Divest Climate Destruction. Bound by Fossil Fuels, Freed by Action.

Messages like these have emblazoned banners on campuses across the country since 350.org’s Fossil Free divestment campaign began last November.

Day of Action for Divestment

Student groups at more than 60 college and universities hosted events to raise awareness and push for fossil fuel divestment as part of 350.org’s #FossilFreedom Day of Action.

Time for Higher Education to Take a Stand on Climate

The high-stakes battle for climate change and what institutional leaders must do

We are running out of time. While our public policy makers equivocate and avoid the topic of climate change, the window of opportunity for salvaging a livable planet for our children and grandchildren is rapidly closing. The way forward is clear, yet for many confrontation-averse academics, the path seems impassable. It requires action that’s unnatural to the scientifically initiated: fight to regain territory occupied by climate change deniers.

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