Athletics

Concussion crackdown in higher ed athletics

Why many concussion management policies and practices aren’t cutting it—and how officials can get on the right track to increase athlete safety

Fans at a University of New Haven football game might notice an odd sideline sight: medical personnel with their heads hunched over smartphones. But these athletic trainers are not checking text messages or updating their Facebook status. Rather, they are monitoring real-time data about the force of their players’ on-field collisions.

Infographic: College sports with highest concussion rates

Wrestling, ice hockey and football have the highest concussion rates among men's sports. Ice hockey, field hockey and lacrosse top the list for women.

Banking on college sports

How making an investment in football and other athletic programs are paying off for colleges and universities

New football teams continue to take the field at colleges and universities each fall, overcoming criticism—from within higher ed and from outside—that sports programs not only suck up money desperately needed by academic departments but also drive up tuition and student fees.

Growing athletics without football

Columbia College expands into several other sports to boost campus energy

The athletic department at Columbia College in Missouri will have tripled in size by the 2016-17 school year. But it has no plans to field a football team, says Cindy Potter, the associate director of athletics.

In 2012, the college—which has about 1,100 students attending class on its “day” campus and another 25,000-plus in various evening, extension and online programs throughout the country—added men’s and women’s golf, men’s and women’s cross country, and women’s soccer. By 2016, the Columbia Cougars will also compete in men’s and women’s track, and baseball.

Inside Look: Recreation centers

Building campus recreation centers to meet evolving student expectations

The contemporary campus recreation center has graduated from yesterday’s dingy weight room. In fact, at many institutions, the rec center serves as a multipurpose space, hosting celebrations on special occasions and promoting student wellness in body and mind throughout the semester.

In Boston: College games on, doctors present

City law says athletes who have or may have concussions cannot re-enter games

Boston is taking the lead in keeping college athletes safe during games.

Its city council recently approved the College Athlete Head Injury Gameday Safety Protocol—legislation that bans athletes who have or may have concussions from re-entering games and requires higher ed institutions to have an emergency medical action plan for host venues. Also, a neurotrauma consultant must be at all Division I football, ice hockey and men’s lacrosse matches in Boston.

A financial game-changer in college sports?

Federal judge rules that college players should be compensated

Quick, what business makes more money than the NFL yet pays most of its workers next to nothing? The answer is college sports, which generate $10.5 billion in revenue, the bulk of it coming from football and basketball. Less than 30 percent of that money goes toward scholarships and financial aid for players.

Championship Center at Creighton University

43,000-square-foot Championship Center part of campus athletic corrdior

Part of a master plan for an athletic corridor on the east side of Creighton University’s campus in Omaha, Nebraska, the new 43,000-square-foot Championship Center is located near stadiums and courts where the big games are played.

CU’s nationally-ranked NCAA Division I men’s basketball team will now practice in the same facility where other student athletes train.

Escaping the athletic trap

How college sports has led to an ‘arms race’ in which there are more losers than winners

College sports has long had its share of scandals, including rape charges against players and coaches, illegal payments to athletes, academic fraud and point shaving, to name a few.

For-profit catalysts of Olympic champions at Sochi

For UB readers who watched the Olympic bobsled races in Sochi, there was a higher ed news story unfolding before their very eyes

Question: What do Coca-Cola, BMW and DeVry University all have in common? Answer: Each of these brand names has a sponsorship relationship with the U.S. Olympic Committee. Though there were over 30 official sponsors, only one of them is a university—so DeVry is well-positioned to be the face of 21st century higher education, a national model customized to each student’s individual and unique higher education aspirations and needs.

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