Athletics

A financial game-changer in college sports?

Federal judge rules that college players should be compensated

Quick, what business makes more money than the NFL yet pays most of its workers next to nothing? The answer is college sports, which generate $10.5 billion in revenue, the bulk of it coming from football and basketball. Less than 30 percent of that money goes toward scholarships and financial aid for players.

Championship Center at Creighton University

43,000-square-foot Championship Center part of campus athletic corrdior

Part of a master plan for an athletic corridor on the east side of Creighton University’s campus in Omaha, Nebraska, the new 43,000-square-foot Championship Center is located near stadiums and courts where the big games are played.

CU’s nationally-ranked NCAA Division I men’s basketball team will now practice in the same facility where other student athletes train.

Escaping the athletic trap

How college sports has led to an ‘arms race’ in which there are more losers than winners

College sports has long had its share of scandals, including rape charges against players and coaches, illegal payments to athletes, academic fraud and point shaving, to name a few.

For-profit catalysts of Olympic champions at Sochi

For UB readers who watched the Olympic bobsled races in Sochi, there was a higher ed news story unfolding before their very eyes

Question: What do Coca-Cola, BMW and DeVry University all have in common? Answer: Each of these brand names has a sponsorship relationship with the U.S. Olympic Committee. Though there were over 30 official sponsors, only one of them is a university—so DeVry is well-positioned to be the face of 21st century higher education, a national model customized to each student’s individual and unique higher education aspirations and needs.

Mobile apps keep UC Irvine on the cutting edge

iPhones are helping athletic staff at University of California, Irvine stay connected

Between scouting for new recruits, traveling to tournaments, and practicing for game day, the athletic department staff at University of California, Irvine (UCI) is always on the go. For years, the department has been heavily invested in social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook, but keeping fans informed on the road had proved a challenge. So back in 2011, UCI equipped all 80 of its athletics staff with iPhones, loaded with a full suite of social media and communications apps.  

Northwestern football players petition for union

Move is an effort to bring attention to medical risks and costs

College football players from Northwestern University in Illinois, along with the National College Players Association, have petitioned to unionize in an effort to bring attention to athletes’ brain trauma risks, sports-related medical expenses, scholarships and academic success.

But do they have a case? And what would unionizing mean for college athletics?

Lynn Russo Whylly's picture

Mobile apps keep UC Irvine on the cutting edge

Between scouting for new recruits, traveling to tournaments and practicing for game day, the athletic department staff at University of California, Irvine is always on the go. But, keeping fans informed on the road had proved a challenge. So back in 2011, UCI equipped all 80 of its athletics staff with iPhones loaded with a full suite of social media and communications apps.

Lauren Williams's picture

Athletic Recruiting Software

Coaches manage student athletes from the recruiting stage to the roster to graduation and beyond with Front Rush. Users can customize the software layout and track anything from academic accomplishments to students’ favorite movies. A database of high school coaches, club coaches, campus sports camp attendees, boosters and parents can also be created.

Settlement stirs up questions about profits from collegiate athletics

Lawsuits were brought by former and current college athletes over the use of their images and likenesses

Paying college athletes is a hotter topic than ever in the wake of a lawsuit that saw EA Sports agree to discontinue its widely popular college football game.

Athletes appear to be the only ones who don’t profit from their likeness being used in games, says Mark D. Simpson, a partner at Saul Ewing LLP. (While not involved with the case, Simpson is a member of the law firm’s Higher Education Practice Group).

Matt Zalaznick's picture

NFL free-agent lawyer ready to represent college athletes

New York-based Winston & Strawn LLP starting what it describes as first college-focused division at a major law firm to represent coaches, schools and conferences -- and the unpaid athletes who generate more than $16 billion in college sports television contracts.

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