Alumni

Thwarting ID Thieves

What most colleges and universities aren't doing to avoid identity theft and fraud--but should be.

American colleges and universities are breeding grounds for innovative ideas and open information sharing. Pair that with a large number of systems on a given network and a vulnerable student population with fresh credit and you've got an appealing target for identity thieves.

A new role for old college towns?

Chautauqua could be an idea whose time has come...again

Have you heard about the high school kid who was so adept at playing video games that he won an athletic scholarship to an online university? Beneath the laugh at today’s virtual world is a less exaggerated but more sober reality. The growth of distance learning, with for-credit courses and online degrees from both campus-based and online schools, promises to challenge the economies of college towns and university neighborhoods everywhere.

Location, variety take priority in meal planning

How savvy administrators make strategic decisions about the whole campus dining experience—because meal planning isn’t just about the food

Only one-third of 3,400 U.S. college students say they’re satisfied with their meal plans, found a survey by food industry research firm Technomic. But schools are finding that to address the problem, they need to go beyond simply improving what winds up on diners’ plates.

The Giving Cart

Creating a shopping cart experience for online donor transactions

The idea was simple: Let online donors make multiple gifts with a single checkout. Not long after Randy Brown joined the Michigan State University advancement team as webmaster in 1999, he got assigned this task, which was anything but simple to execute.

“That was sort of his night job,” says Bob Thomas, assistant vice president for advancement marketing and communications. “It was kind of a running joke. We’d talk about it at annual planning meetings.” One year, someone even presented a mini shopping cart at the meeting to Brown as a tangible reminder.

Opportunity Knocks

Donor-advised funds offer universities a pot of gold

A particular anonymous couple, both Cornell University alumni, could be considered the proverbial advancement officer’s dream. They met in high school, attended college on scholarship, embarked on successful careers after graduation, and raised three children—all of whom attended their alma mater. Recently retired, they’ve now decided it is payback time.

They have joined other alumni, some fraternity and sorority groups, and a state grape growers association in choosing to channel their philanthropy through a donor-advised fund (DAF) account administered by Cornell.

Deepening the Donor Pool

Opportunities open up with the donor-advised funds giving trend

Americans are increasingly choosing donor-advised funds (DAFs) as their preferred charitable giving vehicle. They have become the fastest growing vehicle in philanthropy, outnumbering private foundations by more than two-to-one. In 2010 (the most recent available data), grantmaking from DAFs totaled more than $6.1 billion, according to the “2011 Donor-Advised Fund Report” from National Philanthropic Trust.

TLP: Redefining College Towns for the 21st Century

Online education’s impact and how college towns can reinvent themselves

Growing numbers of students came to campus this fall, as they have for over half a century. The beginning of school year ritual seems to go on forever, but for the first time, there are signs that, in its present form, it won’t. And it is the oft-ignored college town outside the campus that will be most affected.

Behind the News

The stories making headlines in higher education.

Who are you and how did you find us? That's what admissions officers at colleges and universities all over the country are asking this year as "stealth applications" proliferate.

Welcome, Alumni!

Colleges and universities are trying innovative approaches—face-to-face and online—to reach more alumni, young and old.

College graduates are used to hearing from their alma maters with requests about donations and to cheer on the school athletic teams. But lately, alumni from a growing number of institutions are hearing the sounds of alumni offices retooling themselves to offer an unprecedented array of services and programs.

Developing a Smart Social Media Strategy

A University Business Web Seminar Digest - Originally presented on April 6, 2010

Social media is not just for students. Faculty, administrators, campuses, and departments can leverage social media sites such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter to communicate and enhance services to candidates, students, parents and alumni. Our Web seminar panelists, Nicholas Wormley, director of alumni and parent relations at Quinnipiac University, and Karli Grant, of Campus Management, offer guidance on how to implement a smart social media strategy.

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