Academic Leadership

People Watch

  • A. Clayton Spencer, vice president for policy at Harvard, has been named the eighth president of Bates College (Maine), effective July 1. Before spending the past 15 years at Harvard, Spencer served as chief education counsel in the U.S. Senate, working under Senator Edward M. Kennedy. She will succeed Nancy J. Cable, interim president since July 1, 2011.

People Watch

Maravene S. Loeschke is no stranger to Towson University (Md.). She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from there and served on the faculty for more than 30 years. Now she has been appointed Towson’s next president, effective Jan. 1, 2012. Beginning in 1970, Loeschke moved up in the ranks from faculty member to dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communication, a position she held from 1997 to 2002. She is currently president of Mansfield University (Pa.), where she has been since 2006, and has previously served as provost of Wilkes University (Pa.). … David D.

The Sequence of Assessment Priorities

Making choices about how to assess what students have learned

People Watch

Former U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates has been named the 24th chancellor of the College of William & Mary (Va.), effective February 2012. He led the defense department under President George W. Bush and President Barack Obama before retiring this summer.  … Having served in the Texas Senate and Texas House of Representatives, as Texas Railroad Commissioner, and as Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, John Sharp can add chancellor of The Texas A&M University System to his list of public service positions, effective September 6.

Strategic Snapshots

Bill Cooper of Stanford University and Jack D. Zencheck of Yeshiva University (N.Y.), who serve on E&I Cooperative Purchasing's strategic sourcing committee, offer these examples of how their more strategic ideas and actions are paying off for their institutions:

Creating a Community of Leadership

Lessons learned from managing an academic leadership development program

As universities push to support interdisciplinary education and research initiatives, a crucial ingredient is faculty collaboration across disciplinary and departmental lines. True collaboration—where faculty grasp the institutional “greater whole” that clearly values individual faculty contributions yet still transcends the sum of the faculty “parts”—is difficult to achieve.

Discord in Wisconsin and Ohio

At some public universities, giving collective bargaining rights to faculty has become part of the shared governance equation. That equation changed this past winter in Wisconsin and Ohio, as newly-elected governors and state legislatures enacted laws cutting the benefits of all public employees—university faculty among them—and eliminated most collective bargaining rights.

What Ever Happened to Shared Governance?

Twenty-first century challenges are threatening a bastion of faculty power and pride.

The idea that faculty members are uniquely qualified to determine the direction, standards, and practices of the institutions at which they teach and do research has been a tenet in higher education. At many colleges and universities, the faculty has almost sole responsibility for hiring, promoting, and granting tenure to its own.

What Ever Happened to Shared Governance?

Twenty-first century challenges are threatening a bastion of faculty power and pride.

The idea that faculty members are uniquely qualified to determine the direction, standards, and practices of the institutions at which they teach and do research has been a tenet in higher education. At many colleges and universities, the faculty has almost sole responsibility for hiring, promoting, and granting tenure to its own.

Rubber Soul: Leading Polymer Science Universities

Think about everyday gizmos like cell phones, iPods, Kindles, and Cuisinarts. We take items of convenience for granted, yet without polymer science discovery and product development research, these consumer devices would not exist.

For over a century, polymer science faculty and graduate students have explored applications of a wide range of polymer materials, including nylon, neoprene, PVC, silicone, Kevlar, and even old-fashioned natural rubber. So, we offer a guided tour of today’s leading polymer university programs.

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