Sponsored Case Studies & Features

The University of South Florida is one of the largest public universities in the nation, supporting more than 47,000 students across three separately accredited institutions. Its heritage of innovation means making the right technology available for students, professors and administrators, no matter where they are or when they need it.

Addressing the technology needs of today’s students is becoming increasingly challenging, as students expect to have mobile access to any and all learning resources, anytime and anywhere, from any device. These challenges require new IT strategies for institutions; IT managers across campus need to work together with other administrators to address common problems, save money, build relationships and create value for the university.

When UW-La Crosse saw the analog writing on the wall, it embarked on a multiyear project to transform tens of thousands of hours of video footage into searchable digital files. It turns out that removing the VCR cart from the classroom is complicated. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on October 21, 2014, Jim Jorstad, the university’s director of academic technologies, simplified the process.

Faculty and students at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania have been using Mediasite technology for six years to record lectures for flipped instruction, classroom projects and special guests. The events are recorded and automatically fed into a video management and creation platform, My Mediasite. Some classrooms are equipped with multiple cameras to capture a fully immersive, multi-angle video experience to deepen engagement, whether the video is live or on-demand.

The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) was developed to encourage and enhance cardholder data security and to facilitate the broad adoption of consistent data security measures globally. The PCI DSS has just been updated to version 3.0, effective January 1, 2014.

Student loan default can affect an entire campus, as high default rates negatively impact an institution’s federal funding. Therefore, it is essential to keep cohort default rates as low as possible. The right education and communication strategies can help borrowers gain the financial skills necessary to avoid default.

Identifying students who are at risk of student loan default and establishing ongoing communication with those students are two key strategies for minimizing borrower default. Financial aid administrators should include these strategies and more in their default prevention programs, so borrowers are aware of their repayment options and less likely to default. This web seminar, originally broadcast on January 28, 2014, featured administrators from two institutions.

As one of the nation’s largest public institutions, the University of Minnesota includes some 65,000 students on five campuses across the state, with its main campus in Minneapolis-St. Paul. In the year 2000, the leadership of the university began an ambitious plan to install video projectors in all 325 centrally scheduled classrooms and nearly 200 departmental classrooms on campus.

As the academic retail industry faces unprecedented changes in student behavior and rapid advances in technology, campus bookstores need to rise above the transaction. Today’s campus bookstores must focus on delivering a superior experience that supports and celebrates the cultural and academic aspirations of students, faculty and alumni.

Business office leaders need to balance affordability and access with protecting their institution from bad debt. Reducing student accounts receivable is possible, even when increased enrollment and graduation rates are a priority.

Like most modern institutions, Washington College increasingly requires reliable, high-performance computer network access. That’s why the 1,400-student Chestertown, Maryland, institution needed to address a significant networking bottleneck. “By late 2012, the traditional network access control (NAC) device responsible for authenticating users had become a serious choke point,” recalls Cal Coursey, interim CIO. “Not only was it obsolete, but also all network traffic went through the device.

When its credit card fees hit $1.6 million in early 2011, Missouri State University officials decided there must be a better way. “Because it became so common for students and their family members to pay by credit card, the fees became unmanageable,” recalls Doug Willson, the bursar for the 23,000-student institution based in Springfield, Mo.

The Education Corporation of America (ECA) is a privately held company which operates private accredited colleges across the country, including 26 campuses and an online program of Virginia College. ECA provides diplomas, associate’s, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in professional programs designed to prepare students for direct entry into the job market. By 2008, the leadership at ECA was looking for an enrollment and financial planning software solution that could better meet their needs.

For the students, staff, alumni, and others at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, Calif., remembering multiple user IDs and passwords to log in to numerous applications was a cumbersome experience. Resetting the inevitably forgotten passwords was time-consuming and frustrating as the help desk was not open 24/7. The beginning of each semester, when many people make transitions, was always hard on IT staff.

At colleges across Montana, the nonprofit Student Assistance Foundation (SAF) provides students with the knowledge and tools to pursue and fund their postsecondary education. Using proceeds from its student loan servicing business and from its own fundraising efforts, the Helena-based organization offers grants, scholarships, community outreach, counseling, and training on financial education.

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