Sponsored Case Studies & Features

Imagine the life of a university or college records manager or compliance officer. Facing an almost uncountable number of federal and state document management requirements that grow more complex by the day, they’re somehow expected to stay on top of these regulations, and to ensure that every document accurately adheres to them. Any failure to do so puts a university system at a high risk of being out of compliance.

What’s the real impact of employee absenteeism on your institution? In a recent study of colleges and universities, 53 percent of respondents said they rely on manual processes like three-part leave slips and handwritten time sheets to track and approve time and absence. Consequences include human error and the potential for erroneous absence tracking. But inaccurate time tracking also impacts productivity, FMLA compliance, revenue, and pay-outs upon separation or retirement.

It's all very well and good to talk about the need to do more with less—as if this necessity has escaped anyone's attention these days. But how exactly do you achieve this objective in an efficient, rational (and humane) manner? Increasingly, one way organizations are streamlining and gaining efficiencies is through integrating siloed IT systems, eliminating the time-consuming practice of jumping between multiple applications.

John Hermes, vice president of information technology for Oklahoma Christian University, knew the school had problems. Despite a reputation as a pioneer in education technology and as a very high-tech university, Oklahoma Christian (OC) was lagging farther and farther behind in its business processes, says Hermes.

On any university or college campus, information is held in numerous content-related, department-specific applications. For example, HR likely has its own system that allows staff to easily access information through a primary portal; accounting may be set up the same way. And so it goes throughout the campus, with departments utilizing their own systems to conduct business.

Every college strives to maximize electronic payments, but there will always be a need for departments to take in-person payments via check, cash, credit and debit card. Schools that handle these payments and the resulting departmental deposits the way they did 10 years ago, with paper forms and manual data entry, may be missing opportunities for efficiencies and savings.

With  smartphones and mobile devices everywhere on campus, students expect complete mobile access to everything from course assignments and grades to events and sports news. This web seminar, originally presented on April 11, 2012, explored how two schools use AT&T Campus Guide, enabling them to keep students and staff connected, informed and engaged while on the go.

“Colleges and universities are always looking for ways to be more efficient, and there are lots of strategies they’re employing,” says Bill Dillon, executive vice president of the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO). The membership organization, based in Washington, D.C., represents more than 2,500 colleges, universities and higher-education service providers.

Campuses today face a challenge in providing seamless delivery and display of media to classrooms, lecture halls, conference rooms and auditoriums. With different devices and media formats all requiring access to network resources, the need for a centralized solution is greater than ever. John Owen talks about how this was accomplished at Wake Forest University’s new business school facility.

Experienced partners and best practices ease impact of the growth of international students


JJudy Seguy, Nelnetudy Seguy
Vice President, Business Development
Nelnet Business Solutions

Colleges and universities across the country have realized that they can no longer rely on outdated, manual processes that hamper productivity and drive up costs. Changing the way staff works, however, is easier said than done.

Colleges and universities—awash in paper and digital documents, forms and files—are increasingly adopting technology to pull it all together, yielding big savings in time and money.

Texas A&M Health Science Center logo

Life has gotten a lot calmer recently for workers in the Contracts Administration department for the Texas A&M Health Science Center (HSC). At one time, pushing contracts through to completion demanded the skills and steely resolve of a private eye: it wasn’t easy figuring out where the contracts were, who had looked at them and which ones were approved.

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