Sponsored Case Studies & Features

 

Seeking an alternative to the slow and inefficient system of mailing financial aid and other refund checks to students, Imperial Valley College set up its own direct deposit system. The only problem was just one out of 10 students signed up.

 

The decision-makers at Troy University knew that issuing refunds electronically would make the process more efficient, especially for a university with 35,000 students studying at more than 60 campuses. But it also had an unexpected benefit.

 

Wilmington University’s open admissions policy, flexible scheduling and 11 locations in Delaware and New Jersey are fundamental to its mission of offering careeroriented undergraduate and graduate degree programs for a diverse range of traditional and nontraditional students.

 

Yes. Every OneAccount is insured by the FDIC, currently for amounts up to $250,000. In addition, student refunds are protected by FDIC insurance from the moment a school authorizes payment until the funds are deposited in the student’s bank account, regardless of where the student banks.

 

Having grown up in a world of ATMs, debit cards and online banking, students at the University of Louisville wanted a better way to receive financial aid and other types of refunds. Receiving paper checks through the mail was slow, inconvenient and unreliable.

University administrators weren’t satisfied either. For them, the process was labor intensive, costly and inefficient.

Not so long ago, Kutztown University found itself struggling to work out flexible tuition payment arrangements for strapped parents.

"It became so cumbersome that it was taking a staff member and a half just to monitor payment plans here," said Wendy Pursell, bursar of the Kutztown, Pa., school.

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