Sponsored Case Studies & Features

Mobile technology has certainly made life more convenient, allowing employees to work and stay connected from almost anywhere. At the same time, because these devices are so portable and are often used by accessing public wireless Internet, they’ve made life a little less secure.

As college and university administrators find themselves spending less time tethered to their desks—and consequently, to their desktop or laptop computers—they are increasingly relying upon mobile devices like iPads and iPhones to stay connected and ensure their work is moving forward. Consider:

College and university records administrators are increasingly under the gun to meet regulatory and compliance mandates pertaining to document retention and security. This would be no big deal if they just had to track and control a couple of documents (and if these documents were all pretty much the same) but of course, this is hardly the case.

Although the medical school’s old system of managing records with paper spreadsheets and custom databases was working fine, keeping things current did depend on programmer availability, says Monica Baccardax, IT project manager for the Faculty of Medicine at Dalhousie University Medical School, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. And even when all systems were “go,” staying on top of the paper flow was time-consuming.

Imagine the life of a university or college records manager or compliance officer. Facing an almost uncountable number of federal and state document management requirements that grow more complex by the day, they’re somehow expected to stay on top of these regulations, and to ensure that every document accurately adheres to them. Any failure to do so puts a university system at a high risk of being out of compliance.

10 college and university CIOs from a diverse group of institutions around the country joined University Business on July 17 for an online roundtable discussion about bring-your-own-device (BYOD) environments, data security in the mobile age, the biggest challenges they face, and what it takes to create the mobile campus. 

Athens State University—like many institutions of higher education today—is grappling with the challenges of a growing segment of students who take classes online. In fact, 51 percent of the two-year school’s student body takes classes exclusively online. To best serve those students by providing them with the flexibility to view course content anytime, anywhere, Athens State uses Tegrity lecture capture. However, that’s not where Tegrity’s benefits end.

In the world of federal student loan repayment, graduates have the upper hand. So do young adults well-schooled in the ways of money management.

Three higher ed institutions have been recognized for their innovative uses of technology by the judges of the 2012 AMX Innovation Awards. The Stanford University School of Medicine, the Academic Technologies department of George Washington University, and the Wake Forest Schools of Business have been named this year’s winners.
What’s the real impact of employee absenteeism on your institution? In a recent study of colleges and universities, 53 percent of respondents said they rely on manual processes like three-part leave slips and handwritten time sheets to track and approve time and absence. Consequences include human error and the potential for erroneous absence tracking. But inaccurate time tracking also impacts productivity, FMLA compliance, revenue, and pay-outs upon separation or retirement.
When it comes to notifying your students, faculty, and staff about important campus issues and events, you can’t rely on just texting or email. Effective notification platforms also use voice recordings, Facebook and Twitter posts, RSS feeds, and digital signage. But how do you implement a single, centralized notification system that offers connectivity and control of all these communication channels?
In the olden days—prior to April 2011—reconciling financial information at Hofstra University’s Continuing Education division was labor-intensive and time-consuming.
Today, the system is streamlined and general ledger reconciliation is seamless, thanks to Higher Reach by Jenzabar, a leading continuing education software platform.
The uses for AV technologies in higher ed aren’t limited to traditional classrooms. At the University of Florida’s new three-story, 100,000 square-foot veterinary teaching hospital, an integrated AV network is woven into the fabric of the building.

It's all very well and good to talk about the need to do more with less—as if this necessity has escaped anyone's attention these days. But how exactly do you achieve this objective in an efficient, rational (and humane) manner? Increasingly, one way organizations are streamlining and gaining efficiencies is through integrating siloed IT systems, eliminating the time-consuming practice of jumping between multiple applications.

John Hermes, vice president of information technology for Oklahoma Christian University, knew the school had problems. Despite a reputation as a pioneer in education technology and as a very high-tech university, Oklahoma Christian (OC) was lagging farther and farther behind in its business processes, says Hermes.

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