Sponsored Case Studies & Features

Student loan default can affect an entire campus, as high default rates negatively impact an institution’s federal funding. Therefore, it is essential to keep cohort default rates as low as possible. The right education and communication strategies can help borrowers gain the financial skills necessary to avoid default.

Identifying students who are at risk of student loan default and establishing ongoing communication with those students are two key strategies for minimizing borrower default. Financial aid administrators should include these strategies and more in their default prevention programs, so borrowers are aware of their repayment options and less likely to default. This web seminar, originally broadcast on January 28, 2014, featured administrators from two institutions.

As the academic retail industry faces unprecedented changes in student behavior and rapid advances in technology, campus bookstores need to rise above the transaction. Today’s campus bookstores must focus on delivering a superior experience that supports and celebrates the cultural and academic aspirations of students, faculty and alumni.

Business office leaders need to balance affordability and access with protecting their institution from bad debt. Reducing student accounts receivable is possible, even when increased enrollment and graduation rates are a priority.

At colleges across Montana, the nonprofit Student Assistance Foundation (SAF) provides students with the knowledge and tools to pursue and fund their postsecondary education. Using proceeds from its student loan servicing business and from its own fundraising efforts, the Helena-based organization offers grants, scholarships, community outreach, counseling, and training on financial education.

Maintaining frequent contact with student loan borrowers is a challenge at any institution, regardless of size. At the 725-student Spartan College of Aeronautics and Technology in Tulsa, Okla., the three-year cohort default rate was commonly between 25 and 27 percent. “Our rate was so high because we had no easy way to communicate electronically with our borrowers,” says Dean Riling, vice president of administration. “Our accounts system did not connect with student email addresses.”

For the leadership of California State University, Northridge (CSUN), providing a wide variety of dining options has always been an important part of serving the campus community, which is located in the San Fernando Valley. With 38,000 students and more than 4,000 faculty and staff, the sheer size of the university could create a big enough challenge by itself, but the demographics of the community make selecting campus restaurants even more daunting.

Along with minimal fees, students want a variety of options for receiving refunds from their higher ed institution. More stringent regulations and public scrutiny are also prompting institution leaders to look at the adequacy of their refund options.

Communicating with student loan borrowers helps support the successful repayment of loans and can improve an institution’s cohort default rate. If staffing limitations prevent your institution from connecting with your borrowers, partnering with external vendors may be the solution.

Continuing education provides an opportunity for institutions to serve a broader range of students; but meeting these students’ needs and expectations can be a challenge. In this web seminar originally broadcast on Jul 23, 2013, a leader from Emory Continuing Education shared tips for successful practices specifically designed for CE programs, how to leverage software to determine which courses are most profitable, and how the rise of MOOCs will potentially impact continuing education.

Non-traditional learners, the move away from education based on ‘seat time’ and the increase of students who expect options from their institution are all shaping the way admissions offices find and recruit students. This web seminar, originally broadcast on June 25, 2013, featured experts from Blackboard Education Services, who discussed these trends, as well as best practices and strategies admissions staff can employ to meet the challenges of this new era.

As the average student loan debt rises, financial literacy is essential for graduates to successfully manage their post-college lives. Some institutions are going beyond just educating students about tuition payment plans and federal financial aid options. Others, like Creighton University (Neb.) are offering full financial literacy programs to educate students on money management during the college years, and more importantly, beyond.

As students’ expectations for service increase, so does the pressure on an institution to keep enrollment numbers up. The administrative team at Ivy Tech Community College in Indiana decided that to keep retention at a high level, it was necessary to provide a seamless, personalized customer service experience to its more than 200,000 enrolled and prospective students.

With the goal of attracting high numbers of international students, Arizona State University needed a solution to interest prospective students on multiple levels. With Campus Management’s Talisma CRM system, ASU was able to transform its admissions and marketing processes by streamlining and automating certain communications.

Colleges and universities are steeped in tradition, both in culture and business practices. But when traditional processes inhibit growth, schools need to change without disturbing their traditions of brand awareness and academic excellence.

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