Sponsored Case Studies & Features

With  smartphones and mobile devices everywhere on campus, students expect complete mobile access to everything from course assignments and grades to events and sports news. This web seminar, originally presented on April 11, 2012, explored how two schools use AT&T Campus Guide, enabling them to keep students and staff connected, informed and engaged while on the go.

This second of the three-part Connected Campus webinars features a case study from Texas Woman’s University, which used remote management and monitoring systems to achieve significant savings in equipment and energy costs, more efficiently manage staff time and improve the benefits of technology in classrooms and lecture halls.

When applying to college feels more like filling out an income tax return, it's no wonder more students aren't eager to do it, says Ronda Russell, Director of Admissions at Montana State University.

But when students are invited to apply in a more personal way, with an application that shows off a school's uniqueness, it can make a dramatic difference.

Avila University had a communications problem. Or rather, a communications coordination problem.

A flawed process prevented admissions representatives, coaches, department chairs and others from knowing what each had told prospective students. The confusion hindered administrators at the private Catholic school that prides itself on getting to know every single one of its 1,800 students.

The student center is the heart of any campus. It's so important that students at Clarkson University, a small private college in Potsdam, NY, voted an increase in their own fees to help pay to build one.

Clarkson, a nationally ranked research university, has 3,000 students in more than 50 degree programs. But despite its national reputation and dynamic student community, Clarkson did not have a student center.

Sometimes you don’t even know you need a solution until one presents itself. At least that’s how Tegrity Lecture Capture grew from a classroom product to a tool embedded in nearly every aspect of Lawson State Community College. 

When H1N1 made its way to the mountains of northwestern Vermont two years ago, the technology experts at Saint Michael's College were concerned students or teachers might not make it to class. The virus didn't reach epidemic proportions at the small Catholic college, but it energized the team already considering ways to bring lessons beyond the classroom.

As new technologies are developed, many tried-and-true staples of academia have fallen. So it is with the carousel slide projector.

Long a staple of art history classes, slide projectors are becoming obsolete, and while many professors and instructors have plenty of media, they don't have a way to replace the projector itself.

Clemson University, located in the Upstate of South Carolina, has always been quick to use technology tools to advance the accessibility of higher education.

With 55 sites around the world, 17,000 students and 5,000 faculty and staff, distance learning, training, support and the accessibility to other suites of e-education tools is critical.

Change in academia tends to occur gradually, but the University of Missouri- Columbia turned that conventional wisdom on its head when it implemented a lecture capture system that students and faculty alike embraced with unprecedented speed.

The College of Western Idaho was still more than a year away from holding its first class. A thousand details needed to be resolved. Not least among them was the installation of a computer network that would serve the fledgling college’s seven campuses.

Thanks to an aggressive technology modernizationproject initiated by a tech-savvy administration and an energetic technology director brought in to execute the plan, PresentationCollege is quickly discovering how the right tools can attract students and help everyone work more efficiently.

“It’s all about making education accessible to everyone, anytime, anywhere,” explained Ann Watts, instructional design coordinator and portal project manager at DMACC. Des Moines Area Community College is a public institution with six campuses.

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