Sponsored Case Studies & Features

Faculty and students at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania have been using Mediasite technology for six years to record lectures for flipped instruction, classroom projects and special guests. The events are recorded and automatically fed into a video management and creation platform, My Mediasite. Some classrooms are equipped with multiple cameras to capture a fully immersive, multi-angle video experience to deepen engagement, whether the video is live or on-demand.

As one of the nation’s largest public institutions, the University of Minnesota includes some 65,000 students on five campuses across the state, with its main campus in Minneapolis-St. Paul. In the year 2000, the leadership of the university began an ambitious plan to install video projectors in all 325 centrally scheduled classrooms and nearly 200 departmental classrooms on campus.

At one respected university located in the Northeast, becoming one of the leading recipients of federal research and development funds had profoundly benefited the institution. But, managing post-award research projects and grants—particularly the financial end—had become a labor-intensive, time-consuming process that kept researchers from, well, research.

Employing resource management software (RMS) can help higher education institutions maximize A/V, financial, and personnel resources. Additionally, the automation provided by RMS can increase A/V equipment efficiency. This web seminar, originally broadcast on April 9, 2013, was the final in the three-part “Automate Innovation” series and focused on how the University of Minnesota centrally controls its A/V hardware, maximizes sustainability, and improves efficiency through RMS.

“Generation C” is demanding video in all aspects of their lives, including in their learning experiences. Universities ought to harness the power of academic video not only to meet these expectations, but to realize the power of lecture capture, personalized education, and flipped classrooms.

As more students and faculty started bringing their own digital devices to campus, the University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada recognized the need for more interactive learning at the bilingual public research institution.

For Texas A&M University faculty moving from one Liberal Arts and Humanities smart classroom to another, there is no learning curve. That’s because classrooms and conference rooms in the department have standardized equipment. The College Station, Texas, university’s Instructional Media Services Department installed an AMX controller and touch panel in every room, a move that keeps the comfort level high for instructors.

The focal point of Queensland University of Technology’s brilliant new Science and Engineering Centre is known as The Cube—part science lab, part digital engagement, and the hub of scientific exploration for the Australian university's community, as well as high school students and the public at large.

Lecturers are treated like royalty at Penn State’s Struthers Auditorium, a lecture theater in the Smeal College of Business with a range of setups that can accommodate just about any teaching style. "We have designed features to support the instructor’s pedagogical style,” explains Gary Field, research systems manager for the Smeal College of Business.

Consider the scene: an esteemed faculty member stands at a podium, about to lecture to a room full of eager students, and can’t locate the document camera that’s key to her presentation. Or a student who has worked for weeks to perfect his class presentation doesn’t know how to hook up his laptop to the projector.

Automating aspects of technology management can aid colleges and universities in multiple ways, from increased student and professor satisfaction to reduced energy usage and costs. In addition to these benefits, with its resource management software, Texas A&M University has achieved a reduced IT staff size and more effective troubleshooting.

Protecting any enterprise from security threats can be a daunting endeavor, but few organizational structures are more difficult to secure than a college or university. Students, faculty, administrators and alumni—each group has differing IT needs, creating not just one, but many unique security challenges.

Integrating mobile devices in learning is getting to be old hat in Abilene, Texas.

Technology has enabled higher education to extend instruction outside of the traditional classroom. New lecture capture technology such as the McGraw-Hill Tegrity Mobile App allows professors and students to record information on-the-go. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on October 18, 2012, instructors from Laramie County (Wyo.) Community College demonstrated how they use the app to enhance their lab, online, and hybrid classes in the Geosciences department.

The issues of affordability and retention challenge colleges to develop sustainable tuition policies that address the current economic climate yet educate students on the importance of paying their tuition bills on a timely basis. This web seminar, originally broadcast on October 16, 2012, discussed how Nelnet’s solutions, combined with tighter school fiscal policy, can help students meet their tuition obligations even if they do not receive all the financial aid they anticipated.

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