Top public universities push for autonomy from states

Kylie Lacey's picture
Tuesday, October 8, 2013

The chancellor of Oregon's higher-education system currently oversees all seven of the state's public colleges and universities. But as of July next year, she'll be chancellor of four.

The schools aren't closing. Rather, Oregon's three largest state schools are in the process of breaking away from the rest of the public system.

The move, long pushed by some university leaders in the system, will give the University of Oregon, Portland State University and Oregon State University more freedom to hire and fire presidents, issue revenue bonds, and raise tuition.

Across the country, a small but growing number of public universities are making similar pushes, looking to cut deals with state lawmakers that scale back direct oversight, often in return for less funding or for meeting certain performance targets. Over the past few years, schools in Texas, Virginia and Florida have all gotten more flexibility to raise tuition. Other plans have recently been broached, though with less success, in Wisconsin, California and Louisiana.

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