Share economy comes to education: notes from the MOOCs experiment

Stefanie Botelho's picture
Friday, April 11, 2014

When I first blogged about MOOCs about a year ago, they were causing significant consternation about the fate of education. This hasn’t stopped their exponential growth across business and academia. Harvard Business School has introduced its online learning system, HBX. California-based online course provider Coursera just snared ex-Yale president, Richard C. Levin, as its new chief executive. There’s also movement afoot, backed by the U.S. Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, to review how credit is offered, including looking at digital badges, that contain a record of student coursework across institutions.

Everyone I’ve talked with lately believes that online learning is here to stay, and it’s transforming education. According to Michael Nanfito, Executive Director at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), “The business of education has become very expensive, and that’s compelling institutions to sharing curriculums across campus boundaries. You can achieve economies of scale for under-enrolled courses when you combine forces.”

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