Higher education associated with better recovery from traumatic brain injury

Stefanie Botelho's picture
Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Better-educated people appear to be significantly more likely to recover from a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggesting that a brain's "cognitive reserve" may play a role in helping people get back to their previous lives, new Johns Hopkins research shows.

The researchers, reporting in the journal Neurology, found that those with the equivalent of at least a college education are seven times more likely than those who didn't finish high school to be disability-free one year after a TBI serious enough to warrant inpatient time in a hospital and rehabilitation facility.

The findings, while new among TBI investigators, mirror those in Alzheimer's disease research, in which higher educational attainment — believed to be an indicator of a more active, or more effective, use of the brain's "muscles" and therefore its cognitive reserve — has been linked to slower progression of dementia.

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