College Football Owes Its Existence To Progressivism (Opinion)

Monday, September 10, 2012

With two extravagant entertainments under way, it is instructive to note the connection between the presidential election and the college football season: Barack Obama represents progressivism, a doctrine whose many blemishes on American life include universities as football factories, which progressivism helped to create.

Higher education embraced athletics in the first half of the 19th century, when most colleges were denominational and most instruction was considered mental and moral preparation for a small minority — clergy and other professionals. Physical education had nothing to do with spectator sports entertaining people from outside the campus community. Rather, it was individual fitness — especially gymnastics — for the moral and pedagogic purposes of muscular Christianity — mens sana in corpore sano, a sound mind in a sound body.

The collective activity of team sports came after a great collective exertion, the Civil War, and two great social changes, urbanization and industrialization. This story is told well in "The Rise of Gridiron University: Higher Education's Uneasy Alliance with Big-Time Football" (University Press of Kansas) by Brian M. Ingrassia, a Middle Tennessee State University historian.

Intercollegiate football began when Rutgers played Princeton in 1869, four years after Appomattox. In 1878, one of Princeton's two undergraduate student managers was Thomas — he was called Tommy — Woodrow Wilson. For the rest of the 19th century, football appealed as a venue for valor for collegians whose fathers' venues had been battlefields. Stephen Crane, author of the Civil War novel "The Red Badge of Courage" (1895) — the badge was a wound — said: "Of course, I have never been in a battle, but I believe that I got my sense of the rage of conflict on the football field."

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