Professional Opinion

A contract for academia

Escaping separate and unequal faculty citizenship

The “faculty contract” is a process by which faculty, in consultation with their departments and colleges, negotiate—and then, over the course of time—renegotiate their work product. This would institute greater flexibility and autonomy in determining the work product of faculty.

Partnerships promise student success in higher ed

Public universities and private industry create win-win programs

Universities must blur the lines—between public and private, between not-for-profit and commercial, between the liberal arts and STEM—by working with industry and nonprofit organizations to create unique training, research opportunities and jobs. The world is boundary-less, and our teaching and learning must be as well.

Campuses transition to the ‘Internet of Things'

How schools can prepare for the hyper-connected age

Human-to human communications have been the bedrock of our lives. More recently, machine-to-machine streaming has become a dominant and often disruptive dance partner in the communication landscape. And now we are glimpsing a world where human-to-machine links culminate in one seamlessly orchestrated waltz.

Partnerships enhance higher education

Bowling Green programs boosted with help from public and private sector

Much has been written about the future role of the traditional university. In the traditional higher education model, the need to adapt to the future pressures of competition and demographics will be necessary for survival of many small private colleges and numerous public institutions.

Sex abuse in higher ed: a cautionary tale

Victims turn to Title IX when schools fail to act

Allegations of sex abuse, once hidden from public view at universities, are seeing the light of day at record levels. That attention leads to inevitable questions: How can a school conduct the required investigation when a complaint is made, and deal with victim concerns that schools turn a blind eye to their needs?

The university and the city: a model for success

Creating productive partnerships and collaborative innovations

From the earliest days of the modern university, cities have been important partners for institutions of higher learning—largely because universities can bring scholars and students together for creative thinking, while cities can provide the human capital necessary to share innovative ideas with the public.

Strategic planning complete. Now what?

Moving from planning to implementation is just the beginning

Anyone who has worked in higher education knows that harnessing and harmonizing many disparate voices representing different academic disciplines and administrative perspectives can be a challenge. That was our experience at Monmouth University during the more than 10-month process to develop our new strategic plan.

Do women no longer matter in higher education?

Sweet Briar’s closing puts us one step closer to a higher education system without choice

In a “post-racial” and “post-feminist” America, do we still need colleges and universities that serve women? If most institutions now admit those previously excluded, isn’t the disappearance of women’s colleges and historically black colleges, oddly, a good thing? Not in my view.

5 factors for successful technological innovation

Critical success factors for technological innovation: an IT leader’s perspective.

The incoming classes at most schools want ubiquitous technology, and expect it to be available when someone uses their cell phone, tablet, laptop or other device.

IT leaders are charged with fulfilling the campus community’s needs and must do so within budgetary constraints, while continuously scanning the technological environment to make certain that advances are being properly leveraged at a sustainable rate.

College kids and prescription drugs

Habits begun in college may carry on long after graduation Habits begun in college may carry on long after graduation

The U.S. makes up 5 percent of the world’s population, yet it consumes 75 percent of the world’s prescription drugs. Additionally, 52 million people in the U.S. over the age of 12 have used prescription drugs non-medically in their lifetime. With these statistics working against us, it’s no surprise that prescription drugs are being used illegally on college campuses.

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