Professional Opinion

Partnerships enhance higher education

Bowling Green programs boosted with help from public and private sector

Much has been written about the future role of the traditional university. In the traditional higher education model, the need to adapt to the future pressures of competition and demographics will be necessary for survival of many small private colleges and numerous public institutions.

Sex abuse in higher ed: a cautionary tale

Victims turn to Title IX when schools fail to act

Allegations of sex abuse, once hidden from public view at universities, are seeing the light of day at record levels. That attention leads to inevitable questions: How can a school conduct the required investigation when a complaint is made, and deal with victim concerns that schools turn a blind eye to their needs?

The university and the city: a model for success

Creating productive partnerships and collaborative innovations

From the earliest days of the modern university, cities have been important partners for institutions of higher learning—largely because universities can bring scholars and students together for creative thinking, while cities can provide the human capital necessary to share innovative ideas with the public.

Strategic planning complete. Now what?

Moving from planning to implementation is just the beginning

Anyone who has worked in higher education knows that harnessing and harmonizing many disparate voices representing different academic disciplines and administrative perspectives can be a challenge. That was our experience at Monmouth University during the more than 10-month process to develop our new strategic plan.

Do women no longer matter in higher education?

Sweet Briar’s closing puts us one step closer to a higher education system without choice

In a “post-racial” and “post-feminist” America, do we still need colleges and universities that serve women? If most institutions now admit those previously excluded, isn’t the disappearance of women’s colleges and historically black colleges, oddly, a good thing? Not in my view.

5 factors for successful technological innovation

Critical success factors for technological innovation: an IT leader’s perspective.

The incoming classes at most schools want ubiquitous technology, and expect it to be available when someone uses their cell phone, tablet, laptop or other device.

IT leaders are charged with fulfilling the campus community’s needs and must do so within budgetary constraints, while continuously scanning the technological environment to make certain that advances are being properly leveraged at a sustainable rate.

College kids and prescription drugs

Habits begun in college may carry on long after graduation Habits begun in college may carry on long after graduation

The U.S. makes up 5 percent of the world’s population, yet it consumes 75 percent of the world’s prescription drugs. Additionally, 52 million people in the U.S. over the age of 12 have used prescription drugs non-medically in their lifetime. With these statistics working against us, it’s no surprise that prescription drugs are being used illegally on college campuses.

Changing the expectations around technical education

Needs of today’s industry involve liberal education components

Technical education is often touted as solely a means of getting a job. There is no doubt that it’s a key reason students enroll in our programs. And yet if all we do is give our students the tools to secure an entry-level position, then we have failed as educators. We have failed the student and we have failed the workforce.

Redefining the concept of the university branding

President Kimberly R. Cline writes about how Long Island University spreads its institutional ideals beyond campus

Branding may have historically been considered too commercial an endeavor for higher ed, but this mindset has clearly evolved. It’s no longer a question of whether a college should brand itself, but of how it can create an accurate embodiment of its mission and student experience.

Branding a university is fundamentally different than branding a product. A university is a complex, multifaceted institution that cannot necessarily encapsulate its essence with a single word, phrase or logo.

Creating a risk-aware campus

Shared governance, well-defined roles, and livelier language help leaders breed resiliency

The academic landscape is fraught with risk—everything from hazardous chemicals and internal fraud, to flu outbreaks and budget shortfalls.

It seems obvious that any college or university would invest effort to identify and rank its current top risks, if just to assign the right level of attention and resources to each. Yet many academic institutions don’t follow through with enterprise risk management (ERM).

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