Marketing

Strategies to build town-gown relations

As long time neighbors, we simply take one another for granted

In our efforts to market and communicate with our various constituents, we often overlook one of the most important support groups we have—our college town.

It’s not intentional. As long time neighbors, we simply take one another for granted. But that’s changing as institutions and their local governments look to one another for creative ways to collaborate and maximize financial and capital resources.

The relationship-building business

PR professionals have an array of tools—both old and new—at their disposal

Facebook just turned 10. I remember how thrilled I was when 25 people had requested to be my friend by the end of my first day on Facebook. Since that time, I have become heavily engaged in social networking, and have established and maintained relationships through platforms such as Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Tumblr and, of course, Facebook. They are incredible tools for communication.

Answering opportunity’s knock

Grab the low-hanging fruit for public relations and marketing success

As one who enjoys reading history, I often ponder those moments of missed opportunity by myopic individuals or organizations. History is rife with such tales.

Consider the executive at Decca Records, for example, who nixed a recording contract with the legendary Beatles because he didn’t see the group’s musical style and compositions as unique or marketable. Or actor Nick Nolte, who reportedly turned down the role to play Indiana Jones on the big screen, allowing Harrison Ford to become the persona etched in our minds for that character.

Rules for Rebranding

Lessons from Nike and other consumer brands

Most university presidents believe the idea of stealing share from other universities is unsightly. It reeks of business and winning, and it rubs against the collegial grain with other presidents.

I know that because the branding and marketing of universities proves it. If you run ads of universities together, as we did in a study this month, you see a blending of messages and tone that are so similar they are easy to tune out and rarely give students a choice. All they do is reaffirm a choice a current student has already made.