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From buying paper and furniture to defibrillators and health insurance, consortia of higher ed institutions are saving up to millions of dollars annually on items bought in bulk-while at the same time breeding greater, long-term relationships built on trust. That adds up to saved time, fewer headaches.


There is a good deal of talk about the need for accountability today-defining learning outcomes, for example, or asking that faculty be accountable for the effectiveness of their teaching. In short, there is a shift from offering programs and degrees to creating value.

During Bill Clinton's 1992 run for the presidency, Democratic strategist James Carville took a simple route to keeping the campaign on message. Carville posted a sign at the Little Rock, Ark., headquarters of the campaign reminding staffers and Clinton of the now-famous phrase, "It's the economy, stupid."

Faculty and students push knowledge forward in their own ways every day. They expect that freedom, and the academy is designed to give it to them. But donors, whose gifts often come with usage restrictions, may not be so generous.

The e-mail marketing community is still quaking over recently announced plans by America Online and Yahoo to begin charging internet postage for optional "preferred e-mail" service, which would enable company e-mails to breeze past the spam filters of the two e-mail service providers.

Do you recall this popular fast-food commercial from 1984? Three elderly ladies gaze at an oversized hamburger bun until one poses the question that became a cultural catchphrase: "Where's the beef?" In the '80s, the fun tagline became so overexposed that it became pass?.

Given today's constantly evolving technologies-and our seemingly insatiable appetite for immediate information access-planning and designing a new technology-oriented facility can be a daunting task. The digital world has expanded into virtually every aspect of teaching and learning, and it now plays a key role in accelerating economic development.