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IF THE 1970S WERE OFTEN FONDLY remembered as the "golden age" of higher education because of the surfeit of students generated by the postwar baby boom, the 1990s and opening years of the 21st century could be termed "a mini-golden age" due to "echo boomer" enrollments generated by their off spring.

SANDRA STARKE STOOD AT THE FRONT OF A small conference room in Chicago and appealed for consideration from a room full of student services, admissions, and finance administrators. She asked not for consideration of her, but for consideration of each other.

LAST JANUARY KRISTA RODIN ARRIVED AS THE campus executive officer at Northern Arizona University Yuma with a major problem to solve. "Nothing was in place to serve Hispanic students," she says, even though they comprised 57 percent of the student body. "We needed to build programs helpful to them, and importing the curriculum from Flagstaff (the principal NAU campus) without modifications was not working."