Feature

Banking on college sports

How making an investment in football and other athletic programs are paying off for colleges and universities

New football teams continue to take the field at colleges and universities each fall, overcoming criticism—from within higher ed and from outside—that sports programs not only suck up money desperately needed by academic departments but also drive up tuition and student fees.

Waste watching in higher ed

Colleges and universities work to implement new approaches to reducing waste and lowering facilities spending

For many colleges and universities, there used to be gold in garbage. Or, at least, there was some revenue to go along with the recycling stream. But two years ago, the whole landfill landscape changed.

Growing athletics without football

Columbia College expands into several other sports to boost campus energy

The athletic department at Columbia College in Missouri will have tripled in size by the 2016-17 school year. But it has no plans to field a football team, says Cindy Potter, the associate director of athletics.

In 2012, the college—which has about 1,100 students attending class on its “day” campus and another 25,000-plus in various evening, extension and online programs throughout the country—added men’s and women’s golf, men’s and women’s cross country, and women’s soccer. By 2016, the Columbia Cougars will also compete in men’s and women’s track, and baseball.

Inside Look: Business Schools

Active 24/7, b-school buildings are often a campus within a campus and tend to be the envy of educators in other departments

Active 24/7, b-school buildings are often a campus within a campus and tend to be the envy of educators in other departments. They are the technology-rich, active learning environments designed to feel welcoming and bright at any hour of the day, with multiple gathering spaces that provide venues for everything from a small event to a gala reception.

Contagious on campus

Advance planning the key to preventing and managing infectious diseases on campus

Advance planning the key to preventing and managing infectious diseases on campus. College and university officials acknowledge that the most common communicable disease they must address is the flu, but they're also creating emergency preparedness plans to help prevent outbreaks of rarer illnesses like meningitis.

SUNY’s United University Professions: A labor union fighting for higher ed

Union focuses on funding, keeping faculty salary on pace with cost of living and improving job security

The United University Professions (UUP), SUNY’s labor union, has defended funding for public higher education—which has decreased nationwide by about 25 percent since the Great Recession. (Only two states, Alaska and North Dakota, have increased funding.)

Living with unions in higher education

Colleges and universities offer tips on managing unionizing efforts on campus

The temperature around higher education unionizing efforts often runs hot. Officials are reluctant to have outside labor groups on campus or to relinquish control over important personnel decisions—including pay, benefits and other sensitive employee issues. But should higher ed leaders fear unionization efforts?

From mumps to chlamydia

An array of other diseases that may impact a campus

Although flu is the most common infectious disease on college campuses, trailing not far behind it is chlamydia, one of the sexually transmitted diseases most prevalent among young adults.

To help diagnose and treat students for the disease, which can cause infertility in women, the University of Missouri in Columbia has offered free testing events for both chlamydia and gonorrhea at several locations on campus and in the community. Triggered by the CDC’s “GYT” (Get Yourself Tested) initiative, the university last fall increased the testing to twice a month.

Higher ed thought leaders forecast 2015 trends

Presidents and other thought leaders look ahead on cost, technology and learning

Presidents and other thought leaders look ahead on cost, technology, learning and the other big issues in higher education.

Outlook on technology: Tech renaissance

A more robust, post-MOOC phase of online learning on the horizon in higher ed

What cutting-edge devices are going to demand campus bandwidth in the near future? The 21st century versions of two old stand-bys: the refrigerator and the wrist watch. Sure, there will still be plenty of laptops, tablets and smartphones crowding the Wi-Fi, but the “internet of things” and wearable technology are coming to campus, forcing CIOs to yet again boost the power of their networks.

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