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  1. Pay adjuncts for attending the orientation session
  2. Invite adjuncts on staff to participate
  3. Allow a range of campus departments to make presentations
  4. Give campus tours
  5. Host a getting-acquainted meal
  6. Provide online sessions for convenience and review
Since pesky parking to-do’s such as getting a permit or paying a ticket can be done online, there’s no need to find a spot near one of the parking offices at Northern Virginia Community College.

Dan Hofmann has been working for years to make parking about more than just painted lines, structures, and tickets. From city government positions to parking operations management at Harvard University to his current role as director of parking and transportation services at Clemson University (S.C.), he has been a champion for parking efficiencies. It wouldn’t be a stretch to say he makes parking cool.

College administrators are experimenting with cut-rate models by freezing tuition, slashing sticker prices, and rolling back tuition.

Has college tuition begun to go the way of Walmart-style pricing? College administrators are experimenting with cut-rate models by freezing tuition, slashing sticker prices, and rolling back tuition, driven to discover a way to tip the scales toward enrollment growth. So far, results are mixed. Also, the excitement of experimentation is being tempered by the uncertainty of the current college marketplace.

  • With a dramatic change in net price, ensure that enrollments will increase to certain levels. Otherwise, operating costs must be substantially reduced.
  • Identify the types of students you want and set the sticker price accordingly.
  • Diversify the revenue stream and operate more efficiently.
(Getty Images.com/P. Roy Scott) The best approaches to social media outreach involve more than reacting to students who broadcast the negative.

When a student starts tweeting expletives about your institution for the whole world to potentially see, it’s probably time to find out the reason for the lash out and do some damage control.

Beverly Low, dean of first-year students at Colgate University in New York, reached out to one such student and ended up having three meetings with her. “They were meaningful conversations, too,” Low says, adding that the student was more likely to come and talk in person than vent on social media in the future.

1. “It’s not just building the network. You need the support as well. It’s a campuswide effort.” —Eric Maguire, Ithaca College

2. “You can’t use sarcasm or be funny in a text. You have to think about who is reading it. Inside jokes don’t work publicly.” —Beverly Low, Colgate University

3. “Allow room for spontaneous posts to happen each week, since the essence of social media is fluidity.” —Molly Israel, Ithaca College

(Getty Images.com/Patrick George) Today’s hackers are now being deployed around the clock to steal intellectual property, sensitive research, and personal information.

The lone-wolf hacker creating nuisance viruses in a basement has been replaced by sophisticated foreign governments and organized crime rings as the top cybersecurity threat to colleges and universities.

Today’s hackers are now being deployed around the clock to steal intellectual property, sensitive research, and personal information, potentially costing colleges and universities millions of dollars and badly damaging their reputations.

The intensification of cyberattacks against universities and colleges means institutions need more than just clever passwords and the latest antivirus software to protect themselves from today’s more powerful hackers.

There are a wide variety of products that can automatically control who’s using a network, determine what kind of security their devices have, and even fool hackers into thinking they have successfully infiltrated a computer system.

60 percent of students say they would not attend an institution that does not provide extensive Wi-Fi, according to a December 2011 Educause study.

Students come onto campus expecting high-performing Wi-Fi not just in their dorms and classrooms, but everywhere from the stadium bleachers to the quad.

  • Hire a Wi-Fi integrator to assess your needs.
  • Think about the needs of everyone on campus (not just students).
  • Determine a level of performance that can support the busiest times of day.
  • Don’t scrimp on access points (APs) or other hardware.
  • Place outdoor APs under building overhangs to minimize the chance for damage.

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