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(Getty Images.com/P. Roy Scott) The best approaches to social media outreach involve more than reacting to students who broadcast the negative.

When a student starts tweeting expletives about your institution for the whole world to potentially see, it’s probably time to find out the reason for the lash out and do some damage control.

Beverly Low, dean of first-year students at Colgate University in New York, reached out to one such student and ended up having three meetings with her. “They were meaningful conversations, too,” Low says, adding that the student was more likely to come and talk in person than vent on social media in the future.

1. “It’s not just building the network. You need the support as well. It’s a campuswide effort.” —Eric Maguire, Ithaca College

2. “You can’t use sarcasm or be funny in a text. You have to think about who is reading it. Inside jokes don’t work publicly.” —Beverly Low, Colgate University

3. “Allow room for spontaneous posts to happen each week, since the essence of social media is fluidity.” —Molly Israel, Ithaca College

(Getty Images.com/Patrick George) Today’s hackers are now being deployed around the clock to steal intellectual property, sensitive research, and personal information.

The lone-wolf hacker creating nuisance viruses in a basement has been replaced by sophisticated foreign governments and organized crime rings as the top cybersecurity threat to colleges and universities.

Today’s hackers are now being deployed around the clock to steal intellectual property, sensitive research, and personal information, potentially costing colleges and universities millions of dollars and badly damaging their reputations.

The intensification of cyberattacks against universities and colleges means institutions need more than just clever passwords and the latest antivirus software to protect themselves from today’s more powerful hackers.

There are a wide variety of products that can automatically control who’s using a network, determine what kind of security their devices have, and even fool hackers into thinking they have successfully infiltrated a computer system.

60 percent of students say they would not attend an institution that does not provide extensive Wi-Fi, according to a December 2011 Educause study.

Students come onto campus expecting high-performing Wi-Fi not just in their dorms and classrooms, but everywhere from the stadium bleachers to the quad.

  • Hire a Wi-Fi integrator to assess your needs.
  • Think about the needs of everyone on campus (not just students).
  • Determine a level of performance that can support the busiest times of day.
  • Don’t scrimp on access points (APs) or other hardware.
  • Place outdoor APs under building overhangs to minimize the chance for damage.

In the life of an institution, the chief financial officer helps drive the big narrative, but also digs down into the day-to-day. A CFO is strategist and analyst, decision-maker and inspirer, and protector and possibility-seeker all in one.

Students at Savannah College of Art and Design have a variety of dining styles and locations to choose from across campus.

Only one-third of 3,400 U.S. college students say they’re satisfied with their meal plans, found a survey by food industry research firm Technomic. But schools are finding that to address the problem, they need to go beyond simply improving what winds up on diners’ plates.

Succession planning is moving from the private sector to higher education administration.

Zero. Zip. Zilch.

That’s what college president Don Cameron found after searching the internet back in 1996 for colleges with succession plans. Surprisingly, not much has changed, since such programs are still not common within higher ed institutions.

While the “curb appeal” of well-manicured lawns as well as easy parking are crucial parts of the first impression a campus makes, how welcome visitors feel once inside the first building they encounter on campus is just as important.

To make their campuses more enticing and friendly to those who aren’t used to making their way around there, some institutions have created welcome centers as a first stop for prospective students, family members, alumni, and other guests.

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