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  • Hire a Wi-Fi integrator to assess your needs.
  • Think about the needs of everyone on campus (not just students).
  • Determine a level of performance that can support the busiest times of day.
  • Don’t scrimp on access points (APs) or other hardware.
  • Place outdoor APs under building overhangs to minimize the chance for damage.

In the life of an institution, the chief financial officer helps drive the big narrative, but also digs down into the day-to-day. A CFO is strategist and analyst, decision-maker and inspirer, and protector and possibility-seeker all in one.

Students at Savannah College of Art and Design have a variety of dining styles and locations to choose from across campus.

Only one-third of 3,400 U.S. college students say they’re satisfied with their meal plans, found a survey by food industry research firm Technomic. But schools are finding that to address the problem, they need to go beyond simply improving what winds up on diners’ plates.

Succession planning is moving from the private sector to higher education administration.

Zero. Zip. Zilch.

That’s what college president Don Cameron found after searching the internet back in 1996 for colleges with succession plans. Surprisingly, not much has changed, since such programs are still not common within higher ed institutions.

While the “curb appeal” of well-manicured lawns as well as easy parking are crucial parts of the first impression a campus makes, how welcome visitors feel once inside the first building they encounter on campus is just as important.

To make their campuses more enticing and friendly to those who aren’t used to making their way around there, some institutions have created welcome centers as a first stop for prospective students, family members, alumni, and other guests.

Each year during the NACUBO conference in July, Models of Efficiency honorees are recognized at an awards ceremony hosted by Higher One, the program’s sponsor. This year, six of the most recent award recipients were honored at Mo’s Steakhouse in Indianapolis.

Casey McGuane, chief operations officer at Higher One, and JD Solomon, editorial director of University Business, introduced the award recipients and summarized the projects for which they were honored.

Ivy Tech Community College (Ind.) had a classic good news-bad news problem. The good news was that interest in the 31-campus, statewide institution was burgeoning. The bad news was that budget belt-tightening was limiting the ability of staff to tend to the growing attention needed by prospective students while also responding to the needs of current students.

Until recently, LDS Business College in Salt Lake City focused its career preparation resources on the typical strategies. Career Services’ two counselors prepared 2,200 students for post-college job searches. They helped students craft résumés, write cover letters, and practice interviews through career prep courses and in-person appointments.

It seemed like a good idea at the time.

Looking to reduce the cost of preparing the massive, paper-filled binders used by its board members at their meetings, Walsh College (Mich.) officials tried a laptop-based package. That cut down on paper, but the hardware was problematic.

Texas A&M Health Science Center is responsible for ensuring the safety and security of its faculty, staff, and students on eight campuses. Educating and informing the community regarding how to best respond to emergency situations—such as chemical spills, man-made emergencies, or natural disasters—was historically done through printed materials and the center’s website.