Feature

Information Technology at Baldwin Wallace University

Virtual Reality

Baldwin Wallace University's IT department was maintaining more than 65 types of hardware with multiple operating systems, which tied them down and made it difficult to be forward-thinking. Through virtualization, BW consolidated its computing and storage infrastructure. Now it has 87 percent fewer servers, and projects a three-year ROI of 194 percent.

Publications and Printing Department at University of West Georgia

Consolidated Output

UWG's pub and print department was mandated to become self-funded by 2013. The department searched and found equipment that could meet its needs affordably in other departments and shifted them to pub and print. Worker responsibilities were realigned and some student work was offloaded to the students themselves. The efforts generated both productivity improvements and financial savings.

District Admission Office and Registrar's Office at Polk State College

Streamlined Graduation

After doubling its number of graduates, Polk needed to automate its graduation applications process. A customized Access database was created with built-in reporting capabilities. An automated download capability was added to link graduate information with the reporting database. The result: Advising hours have been reduced by 1,600 per year and the additional clerical help is no longer needed.

Office of Supported and Institutional Research at Southern California University of Health Sciences

From Paper to Portal

SCU's Clinical Internship program was manually maintained and took hours each day for staff to review credit request forms and patient procedure logs. A new Clinical Internship Portal automated students' schedule. Students and clinical faculty now submit and approve credit and patient tracking forms online, substantially reducing time involved and eliminating paper.

Admission at Pepperdine University's Graziadio School of Business and Management

Single File

At first glance, the issue faced by Graziadio School of Business and Management at Pepperdine University (Calif.) may not seem too daunting: a few thousand applications a year and 1,600 students enrolled in 16 programs at five campuses. What’s so tough about that?

Information Technology Services at NorthWest Arkansas Community College

Apples to Apples

Four different programs were being used for end-of-course evaluations, and the disparate system was inconsistent and slow. The college purchased an online system with automatic emails delivering a personalized URL specifically for the class taken. The pilot achieved a savings of more than $17,000.

NMU Foundation, Administrative Information Technology at Northern Michigan University

Apply Within

NMU's Foundation Scholarship application and selection process was inefficient and labor intensive. A web application was designed that matched selection criteria to the student's academic and biographical profile. The new system reduced data entry, paper, timing, and labor costs, while increasing data accuracy and providing more information to selection committees.

Financial Aid Office at Dallas County Community College District

Paperless Verification

Financial aid verification was a cumbersome, paper-intensive project that took 6-8 weeks and was prone to errors. With an automated verification solution, DCCCD shaved weeks off the schedule, reduced and realigned staff resources, and even retained some at-risk students.

Security: Show and Tell?

Certain security measures should be visible, but for others, it’s better when they’re less obvious or even hidden. Here’s some perspective on which the campus community should spot—and which they’d better not.

In an era when higher education leaders are more mindful than ever of potential threats to the safety of those living, learning, and working on campus, security planning has reached new levels of complexity. Few would argue that at least some security measures should be highly visible to the campus community. Just as in society at large (think of the police cruiser parked in the median of a busy highway), the right level of visibility can prevent campus crime or violence.

Posting A Threat

Recognizing and responding to threats of violence made via social media

In the wake of the Colorado movie theater shooting and noting the social media clues that appeared beforehand, college and university leaders are taking threats of violence posted to social media very seriously.

Case in point: Kent State University (Ohio) charged 19-year-old student William Koberna with a felony charge of inducing panic and a misdemeanor charge of aggravated menacing for tweeting, “I’m shooting up your school ASAP” and threats to the college president. Koberna’s tweets came five days after the Colorado massacre.

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