Feature

The Big(ger) Picture: Why Integrated Master Planning Works—And Who to Get Involved

At The Ohio State University, the term “master plan” is obsolete. That’s because what traditional master plans often lack—input from an institution’s academic and finance folks—are an integral part of the One Ohio State Framework Plan, shares Amanda Hoffsis, senior director of physical planning.

Recognition Redux

Thanks to increasing affordability and higher ed environment success, campus leaders are taking a closer look at biometrics for building access.

When it comes to access on college and university campuses, striking a balance has always posed a challenge. On the one hand is the need to limit access to those authorized to have it, whether that means students who have paid for dining services or faculty accessing labs or other facilities. On the other is the desire to make the process as efficient and user-friendly as possible. Old standards such as traditional door locks and plastic ID cards still serve their roles, but as with virtually every aspect of modern life, technology is bringing new opportunities.

1st Annual Readers’ Choice Awards

The readers have spoken and for the first time ever, University Business magazine is honoring higher education products and services, in this first annual Readers’ Choice Top Products for 2012. Earlier this year, campus leaders and administrators from across the country had the unique opportunity to nominate what products they and their peers around the country are using, and voice how these products contribute to the success of their schools.

Models of Efficiency Winter 2012 Honorees

Prepared for Productivity

As the December issue was going to press mere days after Hurricane Sandy ripped through the Northeast, we were already hearing of colleges and universities in the region beginning to put the pieces back together. While the monstrous storm caused power outages and damage to many institutions, the effects likely would have been far worse, and even deadly, if not for effective disaster preparedness planning.

Open Source Myth Busters

The reality behind seven commonly held beliefs about open source and what direction they’ll take your institution

The Myth: If you use open source, you’re on your own.

Test Driving Mobile

Today’s higher education web strategy hinges on device agnosticism—and requires content synergy between desktop, tablet, and mobile views.

A college reunion this spring at the  State University of New York at Oswego presented the web-development team an opportunity to build an iPhone app using an open-source software called Kurogo, developed by Modo Labs. The app was a hit, with 30 percent of the 2,000 or so reunion attendees downloading it to share photos and stay on top of events over the course of three days.

5 Reasons Flipped Classrooms Work

Turning lectures into homework to boost student engagement and increase technology-fueled creativity

By now, most of us have heard the term “flipped classroom” and learned that the concept is not as aerodynamic as its name. But it is becoming a movement. In this type of learning space, lectures and other traditional classroom elements are swapped out in favor of more in-person interaction, like small group problem solving and discussion.

Environmental Health & Safety at Texas A&M Health Science Center

Inspection Time

Campus safety inspections, which determined the type of environmental health and safety training needed for faculty, staff, students, and researchers, took three staffers four days followed by several days of data input. The school automated the process, cutting the number of hours in half and saving more than $49,000 in annual training and $8,000 in staff and travel costs.

Information Technology at Baldwin Wallace University

Virtual Reality

Baldwin Wallace University's IT department was maintaining more than 65 types of hardware with multiple operating systems, which tied them down and made it difficult to be forward-thinking. Through virtualization, BW consolidated its computing and storage infrastructure. Now it has 87 percent fewer servers, and projects a three-year ROI of 194 percent.

Publications and Printing Department at University of West Georgia

Consolidated Output

UWG's pub and print department was mandated to become self-funded by 2013. The department searched and found equipment that could meet its needs affordably in other departments and shifted them to pub and print. Worker responsibilities were realigned and some student work was offloaded to the students themselves. The efforts generated both productivity improvements and financial savings.

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