Feature

Cloud Email: The Good, the Bad, and the Uptime

With careful preparation, cloud email can address support and security headaches; improve functionality, productivity, and constituent satisfaction; and save colleges a tidy sum.

Numerous advantages are driving cloud email adoption. Migrating email to the cloud offers campuses substantial financial savings and eliminates on-site mail system infrastructure. Schools avoid email server backups, shrink email support time, off-load maintenance, and bypass the need for server-based anti-virus, anti-spam and email filtering products, according to Rich Brown, founder of Dartware, a network monitoring software developer, and a former network manager at Dartmouth College. Decent uptime (when service is up without any downtime) is usually a benefit, as well.

State-of-the-Art Small Animal Hospital Maximizes Learning, Minimizes Waste

AMX in-camera lights and microphones give more students a close-up view of surgery

Veterinary students who once huddled together to observe a surgeon's intricate moves now have another learning option at the University of Florida. There, AMX technology allows students near and far to have a bird's eye view of every small step of a procedure.

Spotlight on Procurement

With cost containment in the front row of institutional priorities, procurement takes a leading role on campus.

Bill Cooper didn't mince words when Stanford University officials contacted him about coming on board as their director of purchasing. "I said, 'No, I'm not interested in a fragmented function and I'm not interested in an institution that has just a director of purchasing,'" recalls Cooper, who now has an office at ... Stanford.

Thwarting ID Thieves

What most colleges and universities aren't doing to avoid identity theft and fraud--but should be.

American colleges and universities are breeding grounds for innovative ideas and open information sharing. Pair that with a large number of systems on a given network and a vulnerable student population with fresh credit and you've got an appealing target for identity thieves.

Small schools sidestep Sweet Briar’s struggles

Colleges reset tuition, expand programs to withstand higher ed market pressures

While higher ed leaders acknowledge a range of challenges, many say the shutting down of the 532-student Virginia women’s college does not signal doom for small institutions, including those that are single-sex, rural or religiously affiliated.

Higher ed's one-on-one admissions approach

Six ways to customize outreach to potential students

There was a time when colleges and universities could put their best marketing message out to the masses, and wait for students to respond and express interest. Today, it’s about being aggressive without being pushy, being more student-focused without being intrusive, and being more open to digital communication without sacrificing authenticity.

Models of Excellence: Connecting the dots for student success

Student success has evolved from a concept focused mainly on academics and graduation to a host of other goals

The idea of student success has evolved in higher ed, from a concept focused mainly on academic success and graduation rates to one addressing a host of other goals. Campus administrators are helping students immerse themselves in campus life, manage finances, attain life skills, pursue first jobs and launch fulfilling careers. And officials are doing it all by creating connections across departments, as well as among students. These collaborations are at the heart of UB’s new Models of Excellence program.

Evolution of early colleges

Higher education aims for retention and completion boost when students come to college better prepared—and with a few course credits

Early-college high schools have inspired a new wave of close collaboration between K12 and higher education as both sides recognize the benefits of better preparing students for the rigors of college life and coursework. The programs, which are routine in some states, are are only getting off the ground in other parts of the country. 

Supporting first-gen college students

24 ideas for guiding students through the social, academic, financial, and administrative challenges of college

Along with issues of retention and completion, many first-generation students face day-to-day challenges as they navigate social, academic, financial and administrative challenges. Here are 24 ways colleges can support first-generation students in every aspect and stage of student life.

Banking on college sports

How making an investment in football and other athletic programs are paying off for colleges and universities

New football teams continue to take the field at colleges and universities each fall, overcoming criticism—from within higher ed and from outside—that sports programs not only suck up money desperately needed by academic departments but also drive up tuition and student fees.

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