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University of Ottawa: Making learning more interactive

As more students and faculty started bringing their own digital devices to campus, the University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada recognized the need for more interactive learning at the bilingual public research institution. The university responded by employing flipped classrooms, in which the traditional lecture and homework elements are reversed; active learning, in which students read, write, and discuss topics instead of listening to lectures; and specialized spaces, providing educational environments geared toward tech-savvy students and staff.

Texas A&M University: Benefiting from standardization

For Texas A&M University faculty moving from one Liberal Arts and Humanities smart classroom to another, there is no learning curve. That’s because classrooms and conference rooms in the department have standardized equipment. The College Station, Texas, university’s Instructional Media Services Department installed an AMX controller and touch panel in every room, a move that keeps the comfort level high for instructors.

Queensland University of Technology: Creating The Cube

The focal point of Queensland University of Technology’s brilliant new Science and Engineering Centre is known as The Cube—part science lab, part digital engagement, and the hub of scientific exploration for the Australian university's community, as well as high school students and the public at large.

Penn State University: Building a flexible learning space

Lecturers are treated like royalty at Penn State’s Struthers Auditorium, a lecture theater in the Smeal College of Business with a range of setups that can accommodate just about any teaching style. "We have designed features to support the instructor’s pedagogical style,” explains Gary Field, research systems manager for the Smeal College of Business. “Our multiple projector design allows instructors to project multiple sources side-by-side—for example, a document camera to show notes while a video is playing.

Temple University: Streamlining tech support

Consider the scene: an esteemed faculty member stands at a podium, about to lecture to a room full of eager students, and can’t locate the document camera that’s key to her presentation. Or a student who has worked for weeks to perfect his class presentation doesn’t know how to hook up his laptop to the projector.

Innovative institutions enhance teaching, learning and support with technology

At higher education institutions around the world, the innovative use of technology is enhancing the way faculty teach and students learn, reducing support costs and increasing energy efficiency. This past year alone, Temple University in Philadelphia has made seeking tech support in a smart classroom as easy as pushing a button on a control panel. Texas A&M University created a standard user interface for all classrooms, conference rooms, and auditoriums. The University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada, created more interactive learning spaces for tech-savvy students and teachers.

Staying safe “out there”

University and college police departments work hard to maintain security and safety; Laserfiche ECM technology provides the right tool to make the job easier.
University and college police departments may operate in a smaller arena than most city law enforcement agencies, but their need for accurate and up-to-date intelligence is no different, nor are the challenges they face when trying to manage this through a paper-based system. ECM can help alleviate the problem.

Arresting the paper flow

The UCF Police Department has gone from old-school to high-tech, moving records management from paper to digital, and instilling consistency, security, and order.

The University of Central Florida (UCF) Police Department, located on the university’s main campus in Orlando, has 61 sworn and 36 civilian personnel tasked with maintaining campus safety and security. It’s Carla Markx’s job to manage all the records, reports, and evidence flowing through the department. Markx, coordinator, statistical research, records/property & evidence manager for the department, doesn’t tackle this chore alone. She’s assisted by four employees in the Records Division and one in the Property and Evidence Division.

University of Oklahoma to headline free webinar on June 27th

Learn from an educator and an administrator how ECM tools have enabled the University of Oklahoma protect valuable records from disaster.
It was a near-miss, potential disaster that galvanized the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Oklahoma (OU) into taking action, says Dr. Rhonda Dean-Kyncl, assistant dean for college academic services. Her office staff is responsible for safely handling the entire academic histories of more than 8,000 students.

Keeping the disaster out of disaster recovery

ECM technology provides institutions of higher education with the ability to get back on their feet fast, mitigating the wallop a disaster can deliver.

Tornados in Oklahoma and Texas. Wild fires in California and Colorado. Hurricanes in Louisiana and tropical storms along the upper East Coast. Not only do these disasters exert a terrible toll on people and on their personal lives, but they also wreak havoc on all manner and sizes of businesses, institutions of higher education among them.

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