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The go-to data point used to indicate whether an institution is helping students reach success has tended to be its graduation rate. Post-graduation employment is another indicator but the definition of student success has evolved to include many more areas.

More transfer students will now have the chance to obtain an associate degree—with-out extra administrative burden—thanks to a Lumina Foundation grant that National Student Clearinghouse received to provide an automated solution for exchanging reverse transfer student data.

Paying students to explore entrepreneurial ideas: Hope College in Michigan pays students $10 an hour for up to 10 hours a week when they enroll in entrepreneurial programs offered by its Center for Faithful Leadership (CFL).

UBThrive sessions will focus on key themes of growth and organizational structure as they relate to executive leadership, the student experience, operational efficiency and finance.

Anyone on campus interested in learning how to launch innovative programs around student and institutional success will want to attend UBThrive, a conference launching in 2015. From June 15 to 17 in Orlando, higher ed leaders will have the opportunity to hear from peers who are creatively fostering success on campus.

Back in September, the Crough Center at The Catholic University of America (D.C.) became the first building in the world to be LEED certified by students as part of a formal course.

Developed in 2011 by Patricia Andrasik, assistant professor of architecture, the LEED Lab course not only teaches students about green building codes and projects, but certifies them in LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance, or EB: O+M.

Fraternities are in flux as institutions struggle to find a balance between maintaining tradition and keeping students safe.

Among recent developments, Wesleyan University in Connecticut ordered fraternities to become co-educational and Clemson University in South Carolina suspended its fraternities after a student’s death during an apparent hazing event.

Wesleyan’s decision was partially spurred by its student government association, which called for the campus’ three remaining all-male frats to become co-ed. A petition was presented to university President Michael Roth.

Boston is taking the lead in keeping college athletes safe during games.

Its city council recently approved the College Athlete Head Injury Gameday Safety Protocol—legislation that bans athletes who have or may have concussions from re-entering games and requires higher ed institutions to have an emergency medical action plan for host venues. Also, a neurotrauma consultant must be at all Division I football, ice hockey and men’s lacrosse matches in Boston.

Many people question why campus police would need a Mine-Resistant Ambush Protection vehicle like the ones pictured here. (Photo: Creative Commons: U.S. Navy)

One of the more enduring images from the recent protests in Ferguson, Mo., was that of armored military vehicles rolling down the streets of the city. But many have been surprised to learn that this equipment is also showing up on college campuses.

India and China are sending the most students to U.S. colleges to study STEM subjects.

The American higher education system still holds a global appeal, attracting nearly 1 million international students as of July, and more than one-third of these students are traveling stateside to study STEM fields. That’s according to the latest quarterly report from the Student and Exchange Visitor Program, “SEVIS by the Numbers.”

Colleges and universities across the country are poised to lose more than credibility if they don’t comply with sexual assault regulations and policies.

At Dartmouth University’s national sexual assault summit in July, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education Catherine E. Lhamon spoke bluntly.