Behind the News

Colleges train financial aid staff in suicide prevention

Texas Christian University teaching “question, persuade, and refer" method

At Texas Christian University, where there have been six suicides in the last three years, training staff to recognize the warning signs of suicide is considered an imperative. And because paying for an education is a major stressor for students, TCU has had every employee in its financial aid office trained in a detection method known as QPR.

Some South Carolina applicants rejected...and accepted, too

Students may receive automatic acceptance letters to system's two-year campuses

Students who aren’t accepted to the University of South Carolina main campus this spring may still receive some good news with their rejection letters.

Turning to the crowd for project funding

Colleges and universities creating their own crowdfunding platforms

With funding cuts threatening research and other projects, some institutions hoping to promote innovation are following the trend of raising money through social networking.

Switching gears on campus biking

100 University of Dayton freshmen pledge not to bring cars to campus

One hundred freshman at The University of Dayton were given bikes this fall after the students signed a pledge not to bring a car to campus during their first two years at the Ohio school.

People Watch: Kathleen McCartney becomes president of Smith College

Also: Thomas Rosenbaum named president of The California Institute of Technology; Christopher Blake takes helm at Middle Georgia State

Kathleen McCartney was inaugurated as the 11th president of Smith College (Mass.) on Oct. 19. She follows President Carol Christ, who resigned in June. McCartney had previously served as dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She created a strategic plan there that led to the creation of two new degree programs—a doctorate in education leadership and a faculty Ph.D. in education.

College enrollment caps a threat in many states

Survey says community colleges in 10 states facing space crunch

Leaders at public flagship universities, regional institutions, and community colleges are reporting more capped enrollments than in past years, according to “2013 National Survey of Access and Funding and Issues in Public Higher Education” released last month by the Education Policy Center at The University of Alabama.

Colleges face new rules on automated calls and texts

Updates require written consent for cold calls, other communications

Recruitment practices at private colleges and universities just got a little more complicated under the 2013 updates to the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA).

Flood zone finances: Insurance costs rising for coastal colleges

Premiums will increase by 25 percent each year until the “full risk rate” is reached

An ocean view may make campus tours scenic, but when it comes to flood insurance, coastal institutions will soon face a deluge of bills. Flood insurance subsidies for colleges and universities located in federally-designated flood zones ended on Oct. 1, when the Biggert Waters Act went into effect.

Settlement stirs up questions about profits from collegiate athletics

Lawsuits were brought by former and current college athletes over the use of their images and likenesses

Paying college athletes is a hotter topic than ever in the wake of a lawsuit that saw EA Sports agree to discontinue its widely popular college football game.

Athletes appear to be the only ones who don’t profit from their likeness being used in games, says Mark D. Simpson, a partner at Saul Ewing LLP. (While not involved with the case, Simpson is a member of the law firm’s Higher Education Practice Group).

Do college presidents have to be active on Twitter?

Active use of Twitter and Facebook may become a job requirement, a new study says

College presidents, don’t worry—yet—if you only have three Twitter followers.

You don’t need to be a social media superstar right now. In the near future, however, active use of Twitter and Facebook may be a full-blown requirement, according to a study of tweeting in higher ed administration by Dan Zaiontz, a grad student at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.

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