Behind the News

Tiers of tuition

California testing new rates for more popular courses

California has been experimenting with charging higher tuition rates for high-demand courses offered during the winter and summer. The accompanying infographic breaks down what students are paying.

Campuses fly drones for more peaceful purposes

Researchers are developing peaceful uses for unmanned, remote control quadcopters and fixed-wing aircraft

The very thought of drone aircraft makes many people uneasy. After all, drones carrying out attacks on terrorist groups and conducting police surveillance have been in the headlines recently.

Now, they are showing up on college and university campuses but, to paraphrase Obi Wan Kenobi, “These are not the drones you are looking for.”

Defending the liberal arts

A new book celebrates the “gold standard” of learning

While details of President Obama’s college affordability proposals are not fully known, what is clear is that higher education is going under the microscope to prove its value. Add to that a growing chorus of pundits who believe that a liberal arts education is a waste of time and a relic of the past. But two college presidents argue in a new book that a liberal arts education is, in fact, crucial to not just boosting the economy but to solving many of the world’s problems.

Eyes on the prizes for career center play

One university is using incentives to engage students

“Engage with the career center” sounds a bit like “eat your vegetables” to a college student. Students know they should access career planning resources, but other options from the campus activities buffet beckon.

In surveys, graduating students from Loyola University Maryland’s Sellinger School of Business and Management raved about the faculty and facility, but not the career center, says Dean Karyl Leggio.

How campuses attract multi-million dollar donations

Even schools not matching the typical profile are getting large gifts by engaging donors in creative ways

What makes a college or university more likely to attract million-dollar gifts? It may not be surprising to learn that longer presidential tenure, the age of an institution, strong alumni networks, and national college rankings help schools win big donations.

Imported vaccine battles meningitis on U.S. campuses

CDC working with schools in need of vaccines not available domestically

The majority of students, when they enter college, have been vaccinated against meningitis, a potentially deadly bacterial infection of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. In fact, 37 states mandate meningitis vaccination or education before entering college, according to the Immunization Action Coalition, which is financially supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Study: Stopping out makes it harder to start college again

The more breaks a community college student takes, the less likely he or she is to ever graduate

When life gets in the way, community college students often “stop out,” meaning they put their education on hold with the intention to return and complete a degree. But the more breaks a community college student takes, the less likely he or she is to ever graduate, according to a Florida State University study.

Smartphones a mixed blessing during study time

Students say phones are both a great study tool and a distraction

More college students are using their smartphones as a study tool even though the internet and activities like texting were cited as the biggest distractions to hitting the books, according to a new study by McGraw-Hill Education.

Of the 500 students who responded to the “Impact of Technology on College Student Study Habits” survey, 36 percent said they used smartphones at least some of the time for studying.

Oregon universities split from state system

Public institutions moving toward autonomy

In a climate of declining state funding, Oregon higher ed policy leaders needed to bring in more resources while taking some of the burden off students. That’s why three of the state’s universities are breaking off from the Oregon University System. Effective July 1, Oregon State University, Portland State University and the University of Oregon will have their own boards.

Colleges train financial aid staff in suicide prevention

Texas Christian University teaching “question, persuade, and refer" method

At Texas Christian University, where there have been six suicides in the last three years, training staff to recognize the warning signs of suicide is considered an imperative. And because paying for an education is a major stressor for students, TCU has had every employee in its financial aid office trained in a detection method known as QPR.

Pages