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Beyond the News

College presidents are using Twitter to interact with students and faculty.

College presidents, don’t worry—yet—if you only have three Twitter followers.

You don’t need to be a social media superstar right now. In the near future, however, active use of Twitter and Facebook may be a full-blown requirement, according to a study of tweeting in higher ed administration by Dan Zaiontz, a grad student at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.

Sidney A. Ribeauis leaving Howard University after five years in office.

On Oct. 1, Howard University (D.C.) President Sidney A. Ribeau announced his retirement from the historically black college after five years in office. He will leave the presidency at the end of December.

Ribeau signed a contract extension just this summer to serve until June 2015. Speculation is that debate over the health of the university and Ribeau’s management of it may be why he has stepped down suddenly. Alumnus Wayne A.I. Frederick, Howard’s former provost and chief academic officer, has been named interim president.

Katherine Bergeron, currently the dean of Brown University, moves to Connecticut College on Jan. 1.

The Connecticut College Board of Trustees has selected Katherine Bergeron, currently the dean of Brown University, as the 11th president of the college. She will take office Jan. 1, succeeding Leo I. Higdon Jr., who will retire in December after seven years there.

What’s one way to please students, engage an entire campus community, and save money all while helping protect the environment?

The answer is greening sports programs, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in its new report, “Collegiate Game Changers.”

Subordinated and marginalized. That’s how faculty of color at community colleges are feeling.

More higher ed leaders are concerned about maintaining enrollment levels at the same time Census numbers have revealed that colleges and universities lost half a million students in 2012. A drop-off had been anticipated for some time, but now institutions must scramble to manage.

Leaders at UNC-Chapel Hill and elsewhere can take actions to ensure that athletics don’t get too great a focus to the detriment of academics.

After several years of well-publicized scandals in the athletics programs at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a new report by the Association of American Universities (AAU) urges UNC to put as much energy into academics as it does into winning national championships.

Higher ed has a new recruitment tool available with LinkedIn’s University Pages, which not only promote a school, but add a powerful networking platform for current and future alumni.

“A LinkedIn University Page includes all the things that touch a university in one space,” says John Hill, LinkedIn’s higher education evangelist. “It’s rich media, so it can have videos, imagery, blog posts, and so on.”

Shop24, shown here on SUNY Old Westbury’s campus, has locations at 10 campuses nationwide, with another 30 slated to open in the next year.

To meet the modern college student’s need for late-night munchies or grocery items, self-service vending stores have begun popping up on some campuses. One of the newest such store is SUNY Old Westbury’s Shop24, which opened this fall and serves the campus’ 4,400 students.

More than 165 college and university presidents have asked President Obama and Congress to help close the “innovation deficit.” In an open letter coordinated by the Association of American Universities (AAU) and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), the presidents urge them not to cut additional research and education discretionary spending. By coining the phrase “innovation deficit,” they hope to spark national and local conversations.

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