Behind the News

1-2-3-4, They Love What They Wore

Not many colleges have a four-star general at the helm, but students at Birmingham-Southern College (Ala.) are such big fans of their president, former Marine Corps Commandant Charles C. Krulak, that the campus bookstore wanted to come up with a t-shirt reflecting how they feel. When the store received a copy of a USMC poster featuring Krulak (known on campus as "the General") with his arm around a young recruit, they decided to use the image and make it their own.

$10K Degree Update

California, Texas, and Florida tend to be bellwether states for education because of their sheer size. So recent legislation proposed in California should have an interesting effect on the $10,000-degree movement. In January, Assemblyman Dan Logue, R-Marysville proposed legislation to make it possible for students to get a degree from the California State University system through closer coordination between high schools, community colleges, and CSU. He later proposed a companion bill for $20,000 degrees from the University of California system.

Getting Closure

The aftermath of a for-profit’s abrupt shuttering

Students imagine a number of outcomes when they enroll in a course of study, but the one that probably doesn’t occur to them is the possibility they’ll show up to class and find their college closed.

Students Look the Part for Learning 9-to-5 Skills

Starting this fall, full-time students enrolled in Wake Forest University’s (N.C.) Master of Arts in Management (M.A.) Program won’t be able to roll out of bed and rush to class. Instead they will be required to be in school from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the weekday to learn real-world responsibility and accountability.

Enrollment Slows Nationally

It had been predicted for years and now it looks like it is finally coming to pass. No, not the Mayan calendar apocalypse. After years of steep increases, higher education enrollments are slowing, almost across the board. In its “Projections of Education Statistics to 2021” report, the Department of Education predicts that overall higher education enrollment will rise only about 15 percent from 2010 to 2021, after witnessing a 46 percent increase from 1996 to 2010.

Food (Allergy) Fight: Safe Student Dining a Right

Continually provide both hot and cold gluten-free and allergen-free options in dining hall food lines. Allow students to pre-order allergen-free meals. Provide a dedicated space in the main dining hall to store and prepare gluten-free and allergen-free foods and to avoid cross-contamination.

Bullying at Work on Campus

Higher ed workers bullied more than general workforce

Bullies aren’t just on the playground. In fact, 62 percent of higher ed employees surveyed for a recent study reported witnessing or experiencing bullying in the past 18 months. That’s exactly one-quarter more than the 37 percent of the general workforce who report the same, according to Workplace Bullying Institute Data.

Promoting the Liberal Arts

In the movie “Idiocracy,” the world has degenerated to garbage-filled state where people don’t know basic farming. Could this fate be avoided by maintaining support for the liberal arts?

The Doctor Will Video Chat with You Now

At Harrisburg University of Science and Technology (Pa.), seeing a doctor is now just a click away. Using Rapid Remedy, an online service that allows students to video chat with board-certified physicians, Harrisburg students can skip unneeded office visits while saving the school money, shares Harrisburg’s President Eric Darr.

Grand Canyon University Joins Western Athletic Conference

‘For-profit’ just a business model when it comes to college sports

Could the admission of Grand Canyon University (Ariz.) into the Western Athletic Conference help change the perception of for-profits among the higher education community?

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