Behind the News

Campus frat culture in the spotlight

Wesleyan University orders fraternities to become co-ed; Clemson has suspended them

Fraternities are in flux as institutions struggle to find a balance between maintaining tradition and keeping students safe.

Among recent developments, Wesleyan University in Connecticut ordered fraternities to become co-educational and Clemson University in South Carolina suspended its fraternities after a student’s death during an apparent hazing event.

Wesleyan’s decision was partially spurred by its student government association, which called for the campus’ three remaining all-male frats to become co-ed. A petition was presented to university President Michael Roth.

In Boston: College games on, doctors present

City law says athletes who have or may have concussions cannot re-enter games

Boston is taking the lead in keeping college athletes safe during games.

Its city council recently approved the College Athlete Head Injury Gameday Safety Protocol—legislation that bans athletes who have or may have concussions from re-entering games and requires higher ed institutions to have an emergency medical action plan for host venues. Also, a neurotrauma consultant must be at all Division I football, ice hockey and men’s lacrosse matches in Boston.

Surplus military gear added to campus police arsenal

President Obama urges review of equipment program

One of the more enduring images from the recent protests in Ferguson, Mo., was that of armored military vehicles rolling down the streets of the city. But many have been surprised to learn that this equipment is also showing up on college campuses.

STEM’s international college appeal

Top schools for STEM internationals include the University of Southern California, Purdue University (Ind.), the University of Illinois, New York University and Columbia University

The American higher education system still holds a global appeal, attracting nearly 1 million international students as of July, and more than one-third of these students are traveling stateside to study STEM fields. That’s according to the latest quarterly report from the Student and Exchange Visitor Program, “SEVIS by the Numbers.”

Out of compliance on sex assault, out of funding

Assistant secretary for civil rights threatens to withhold federal funds

Colleges and universities across the country are poised to lose more than credibility if they don’t comply with sexual assault regulations and policies.

At Dartmouth University’s national sexual assault summit in July, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education Catherine E. Lhamon spoke bluntly.

States pushing ‘15 to Finish’ graduate-on-time message

Program touts full course-load to increase academic success and decrease debt

West Virginia is the latest state to encourage college students to take 15 credits or more every semester so they can graduate on time.

Sponsored by the nonprofit Complete College America, the “15 to Finish” campaign is already in 15 other states, most notably Hawaii, which first developed the program. In its first year, 2011-12, the state was able to increase the number of students taking 15 hours per semester by more than 17 percent.

Campus leaders plan growth and investment

Fresh funding heading towards all levels of college operations, University Business reader survey says

Colleges and universities of all types and sizes are planning new investments in virtually all areas of operations as economic recovery entrenches itself in higher education, according to a University Business survey of campus leaders.

College students pay more as subsidies drop

Funding for medicaid, correctional facilities and K-12 wins out over higher education

Subsidies for public higher ed institutions are the lowest in a decade—and for the first time, students are paying, on average, half or more of their tuition’s cost. Those are a few of the financial trends substantiated by a recent American Institutes for Research (AIR) study.

Interactive video within MOOCs: Impact on b-schools

“SuperText” may be a threat or an opportunity

“SuperText”—the interactive video and assessments within MOOCs—may be a threat or an opportunity to full-time business schools and MBA programs.

It depends on which path officials take in deploying the technology, says the “Will Video Kill the Classroom Star?” report from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

IT centralization: Institutional hesitation

An average of 18 percent of campus IT systems are redundant, a recent survey says

Despite technology’s critical role in higher ed, there remains a gap between central IT and the rest of campus that can lead to unnecessary spending.

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